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E.g., 11/23/2017
E.g., 11/23/2017
Your search has returned 21 articles:
  • Feature

    Big Fishing Yields Small Fish

    Sharks, billfish, cod, tuna and other fish-eating fish — the sea’s equivalents to lions on the Serengeti — dominated the marine world as recently as four decades ago. They culled sick, lame and old animals and kept populations of marine herbivores in check, preventing marine analogs of antelopes from overgrazing their environment.

    But the reign of large predators now...

    03/25/2011 - 11:51
  • Feature

    Lettuce Liability

    Little more than a year ago, supermarkets from coast to coast stripped fresh spinach from produce aisles as a food-poisoning outbreak swept the nation. From mid-August through September 2006, virulent bacterial infections sickened at least 204 spinach consumers. Five died and 30 others suffered acute kidney failure.

    Among more than 3,500 genetically unique...

    12/03/2007 - 19:41 Agriculture
  • News

    Crystal matchmaker

    Having evolved from mathematical playthings to curiosities of physics, the structures known as quasicrystals could become great tools for the electronics industry.

    Like crystals, quasicrystals are built from units of atoms arranged in an orderly fashion. But, unlike crystals, quasicrystals have building blocks that interlock in a pattern that doesn't repeat at regular intervals (SN: 10/...

    07/18/2007 - 12:34 Materials
  • Science Surfing

    Sounds of the Seasons

    A growing interest in acoustic ecology calls attention to the myriad ways in which sounds influence human behavior.

    Go to: http://www.sciencenews.org/pages/sn_arch/12_21_96/bob2.htm

    12/13/2006 - 12:29
  • Feature

    Dashing Rogues

    In February 1933, the Navy tanker USS Ramapo was steaming its way from the Philippines to San Diego in the midst of an exceptionally strong storm. The 146-meter-long ship was buffeted by near-hurricane–force winds. Early on the morning of Feb. 7, a wave far larger than the others surrounding the ship overtook the Ramapo from behind.

    As the stern of the ship dropped...

    11/13/2006 - 09:18 Earth
  • Feature

    Energy on Ice

    In March 2002, an international team of scientists pumped hot water down a 1,200-meter well located at the edge of the Mackenzie River Delta in northwestern Canada. The water seeped into the pores of the perpetually frozen sediments, melting icelike crystals along its path. These were no ordinary crystals, but frozen cages of water molecules filled with methane, the main constituent of...

    06/21/2005 - 11:02 Chemistry
  • Feature

    Don't Let the Bugs Bite

    Celia Cordón-Rosales wants to build a ghost town. A dozen small thatch and adobe huts would stand in several clusters. A few pigs would occupy nearby pens, insects would buzz to and fro, and bacteria would live out unremarkable lives. But the mock hamlet would be devoid of human residents. It would also be enclosed in nets of mesh so fine that nothing as large as a bug could escape. And a...

    08/08/2004 - 14:45
  • Food for Thought

    Seeing Red and Finding Fraudulent Fish

    Peter B. Marko wanted his marine biology graduate students to be able to do DNA fingerprinting of tissues. So, he gave them the assignment of analyzing 22 samples of red snapper meat from fish retailers in eight states. The students extracted DNA from each piece of fish, copied it so there would be enough material to analyze, then matched the DNA in each batch against an archived map of the...

    07/20/2004 - 18:33 Nutrition
  • Food for Thought

    Wash Those Hands!

    When physicians talk about food poisoning, they're not usually referring to the effects of natural toxins made by plants or animals. But some foods do carry that danger. For instance, potatoes can develop pest-deterring agents in and just under their skins that can sicken or, rarely, kill a person. And certain fish — such as the infamous puffer — produce chemicals that have done in more than...

    10/08/2003 - 13:10 Technology
  • Feature

    Seeking the Mother of All Matter

    "Oh, I got plenty o' nuthin', an' nuthin's plenty for me...".—"Porgy and Bess" George Gershwin, 1935

    Bright opposing beams of gold ions finally were playing chicken within the tunnels of a vast new particle collider on Long Island. The scientists in the control room were delighted to have their machine up and running after 9 years of construction, but they also felt...

    04/29/2003 - 16:46 Physics