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E.g., 11/12/2018
E.g., 11/12/2018
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  • moon
  • cosmic microwave
  • Kepler telescope illustration
Your search has returned 9287 articles:
  • News

    China is about to visit uncharted territory on the moon

    China is about to make space history. In December, the country will launch the first spacecraft ever to land on the farside of the moon. Another craft, slated for takeoff in 2019, will be the first to bring lunar rocks back to Earth since 1976.

    These two missions — the latest in China’s lunar exploration series named after the Chinese moon goddess, Chang’e — are at the forefront of...

    11/11/2018 - 07:00 Planetary Science
  • News

    Hints of Oort clouds around other stars may lurk in the universe’s first light

    A thick sphere of icy debris known as the Oort cloud shrouds the solar system. Other star systems may harbor similar icy reservoirs, and those clouds may be visible in the universe’s oldest light, researchers report.

    Astronomer Eric Baxter of the University of Pennsylvania and colleagues looked for evidence of such exo-Oort clouds in maps of the cosmic microwave background, the cool...

    11/09/2018 - 06:00 Planetary Science, Exoplanets, Cosmology
  • News

    The planet-hunting Kepler space telescope is dead

    NASA’s premier planet-hunting space telescope is out of gas.

    The Kepler space telescope can no longer search for planets orbiting other stars, ending the 9½-year mission, officials from the agency announced in a news conference on October 30.

    “Because of fuel exhaustion, the Kepler spacecraft has reached the end of its service life,” said Charlie Sobeck, a project system engineer...

    10/30/2018 - 17:11 Exoplanets
  • Feature

    How to make organ transplants last

    Trent Jackson’s life changed abruptly in early 2015. The computer engineer thought he had the flu. His then-wife, Donna Sylvia, thought differently. His skin was turning a dark golden yellow, almost brown, “like he was getting some kind of weird tan,” she says. On Wednesday, January 28, Sylvia and Jackson’s brother Todd finally persuaded Jackson to see a doctor.

    Sylvia’s suspicions were...

    10/21/2018 - 05:00 Immune Science, Cells, Clinical Trials
  • News

    These ancient mounds may not be the earliest fossils on Earth after all

    Tiny mounds touted as the earliest fossilized evidence of life on Earth may just be twisted rock.

    Found in 3.7-billion-year-old rocks in Greenland, the mounds strongly resemble cone-shaped microbial mats called stromatolites, researchers reported in 2016. But a new analysis of the shape, internal layers and chemistry of the structures suggests that the mounds weren’t shaped by microbes...

    10/17/2018 - 13:00 Earth, Paleontology, Microbes
  • Editor's Note

    Waking up early to cover science’s biggest honor

    At 5:10 a.m. on October 1, news director Macon Morehouse walked into her kitchen, powered on her computer and hit “start” on the coffeemaker she had preloaded the night before. It was game day for the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine, and she wanted to be ready when the announcement came from Stockholm, six time zones away.

    It’s a ritual we follow every year at Science News;...

    10/17/2018 - 07:00 Science & Society
  • News

    Gene editing creates mice with two biological dads for the first time

    For the first time, researchers have created mice with two dads. No female contributed to the rodents’ genetic makeup.

    This unusual reproduction took place in a lab where researchers gathered fathers’ stem cells, and used them to produce embryos that were implanted into surrogate mothers. The technique required scientists to edit the animals’ genes in order for the mice to mature enough...

    10/11/2018 - 12:02 Cells, Development
  • Reviews & Previews

    ‘Sawbones’ invites readers to laugh at the bizarre history of medicine

    The Sawbones BookJustin McElroy and Dr. Sydnee McElroyTeylor Smirl (illustrator)Weldon Owen, $24.99

    Humans took a long, weird road to modern medicine. We don’t have everything figured out yet, but at least we’ve learned not to drink the feces of cholera victims and never to plug dental cavities with a lizard’s liver — unlike some of our ancestors.

    Gruesome methods like these...

    10/09/2018 - 07:00 Health, History of Science, Science & Society
  • News

    Spiky ice spires may stud the equator of Jupiter’s moon Europa

    Europa’s frozen landscape could be treacherous territory for future lunar landers.

    Jagged spires of ice may stud the Jovian moon’s equator, researchers report October 8 in Nature Geosciences. These structures, called penitentes, could reach heights of 15 meters and occur roughly every 7.5 meters, computer simulations show, potentially rendering parts of the moon unnavigable in future...

    10/08/2018 - 11:00 Planetary Science
  • News

    Laser mapping shows the surprising complexity of the Maya civilization

    A laser-shooting eye in the sky has revealed the previously unappreciated size and complexity of ancient Maya civilization, both before and during its presumed heyday, scientists say.

    Maya people in what’s now northern Guatemala built surprisingly extensive defensive structures and roads as part of political systems featuring interconnected cities, starting at least several hundred years...

    09/27/2018 - 14:22 Archaeology, Technology