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E.g., 09/24/2017
E.g., 09/24/2017
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  • chicken farm
  • Cassini at Saturn
  • sea star tube feet
Your search has returned 5997 articles:
  • Reviews & Previews

    ‘Big Chicken’ chronicles the public health dangers of using antibiotics in farming

    Big ChickenMaryn McKennaNational Geographic, $27

    Journalist Maryn McKenna opens Big Chicken by teasing our taste buds with a description of the succulent roasted chickens she bought at an open-air market in Paris. The birds tasted nothing like the bland, uniform chicken offered at U.S. grocery stores. This meat had an earthy, lush, animal flavor. From this tantalizing oh-so-European...

    09/17/2017 - 08:00 Agriculture, Health, Science & Society
  • Science Ticker

    The Cassini probe dies tomorrow. Here’s how to follow its end

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    It’s not every day that a spacecraft gets vaporized by the very planet it sought to explore.

    After 13 years studying Saturn and its moons, NASA’s Cassini spacecraft will plunge into the ringed gas giant’s atmosphere. The mission will come to a close at about 7:55 a.m. EDT (4:55 a.m. PDT) Friday, when Saturn’s atmosphere pushes Cassini’s antenna away from Earth,...

    09/14/2017 - 14:30 Planetary Science
  • News

    Like sea stars, ancient echinoderms nibbled with tiny tube feet

    Sea stars and their relatives eat, breathe and scuttle around the seafloor with tiny tube feet. Now researchers have gotten their first-ever look at similar tentacle-like structures in an extinct group of these echinoderms.

    It was suspected that the ancient marine invertebrates, called edrioasteroids, had tube feet. But a set of unusually well-preserved fossils from around 430 million...

    09/12/2017 - 19:05 Paleontology, Animals
  • Growth Curve

    Sugars in breast milk may fight harmful bacteria directly

    Scientists may have found a sweet new way to fight Group B Strep: Sugars in some women’s breast milk busted up colonies of the potentially harmful bacteria in a small lab study.

    The results, published online June 1 in ACS Infectious Diseases and presented August 20 in Washington, D.C., at the American Chemical Society’s annual meeting, raise all sorts of possibilities. Perhaps these...

    09/08/2017 - 16:30 Health
  • News in Brief

    Star that exploded in 1437 tracked to its current position

    Some stars erupt like clockwork. Astronomers have tracked down a star that Korean astronomers saw explode nearly 600 years ago and confirmed that it has had more outbursts since. The finding suggests that what were thought to be three different stellar objects actually came from the same object at different times, offering new clues to the life cycles of stars.

    On March 11, 1437, Korean...

    08/30/2017 - 13:00 Astronomy, History of Science
  • Feature

    Birth control research is moving beyond the pill

    Mention “the pill,” and only one kind of drug comes to mind. The claim that oral contraceptives have on that simple noun testifies to the pill’s singular effect in the United States. Introduced in 1960, the pill gave women reliable access to birth control for the first time. The opportunity to delay having children opened the door to higher education and professional careers for many women....

    08/22/2017 - 12:30 Health, Human Development
  • News

    Cosmic lens lets astronomers zoom in on a black hole’s burps

    Astronomers have caught their best look ever at blobs of hot gas fleeing a supermassive black hole, thanks to a new kind of cosmic magnifying glass.

    Anthony Readhead of the Owens Valley Radio Observatory at Caltech and colleagues caught two small, hot bursts traveling away from a bright galaxy called J1415+1320 at near the speed of light. Although the galaxy is billions of light-years...

    08/18/2017 - 17:01 Astronomy
  • News

    Embryos kill off male tissue to become female

    Add a new ingredient to the sugar, spice and everything nice needed to make girls.

    A protein called COUP-TFII is necessary to eliminate male reproductive tissue from female mouse embryos, researchers report in the Aug. 18 Science. For decades, females have been considered the “default” sex in mammals. The new research overturns that idea, showing that making female reproductive organs is...

    08/17/2017 - 14:17 Development
  • Science Ticker

    Giant larvaceans could be ferrying ocean plastic to the seafloor

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    Everybody poops, but the poop of bloblike filter feeders called giant larvaceans could be laced with microplastics.

    Every day, these gelatinous creatures (Bathochordaeus stygius) build giant disposable mucus mansions to round up zooplankton into their stomachs — sometimes sifting through around 80 liters of seawater per hour. Kakani Katija and her colleagues at the...

    08/16/2017 - 15:23 Animals, Oceans, Pollution
  • Editor's Note

    A lot of life on planet Earth is awful and incredible

    In deciding on a cover image for this issue, the Science News team had a difficult choice to make: Do we print a picture of a tick that reminds readers how much we all despise these critters? Or, do we go with a closeup view that masks ticks’ revolting character and makes you wonder: “Ooh. What’s that?” We chose to highlight hostilities to match the story headline, “Bulletins from the tick...

    08/09/2017 - 11:36 Animals