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  • Ebola virus
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Your search has returned 2911 articles:
  • News in Brief

    Rapid Ebola test to detect early infection in the works

    WASHINGTON — Diagnosing Ebola earlier is becoming almost as easy as taking a home pregnancy test. 

    Scientists are developing antibodies for a test that can sniff out the deadly virus more quickly and efficiently than current tests, researchers reported February 6 at the American Society for Microbiology Biothreats meeting.

    Detecting Ebola’s genetic material in patients’ blood...

    02/10/2017 - 16:46 Immune Science
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers weigh in on dinos, dark matter and more

    Prehistoric tweet

    Researchers uncovered the fossilized voice box, called a syrinx, of an ancient bird that lived 68 million to 66 million years ago. The bird may have sounded like a honking duck, Meghan Rosen reported in “Ancient avian voice box unearthed” (SN: 11/12/16, p. 7).

    Online reader David Spector wondered if researchers could 3-D print the syrinx to replicate the ancient bird’s...

    01/11/2017 - 12:15 Paleontology, Particle Physics, Health
  • Feature

    The Flint water crisis and other public health woes from 2016

    Drug use continued to threaten the health and safety of the American public in 2016, while a hidden menace in drinking water remained a major worry for the people of Flint, Mich.

    Teen vaping

    Vaping has surpassed cigarette smoking among U.S. high school students, according to a report released in 2016 from the National Youth Tobacco Survey. Estimates suggest that some 2.39 million U.S....

    12/20/2016 - 13:00 Health, Science & Society
  • Essay

    The fight against infectious diseases is still an uphill battle

    It was barely more than half a century ago that the Nobel Prize–winning virologist Sir Frank Macfarlane Burnet mused about the demise of contagions. “To write about infectious disease,” he wrote in 1962, “is almost to write of something that has passed into history.”

    If only. In the past several decades, over 300 infectious pathogens have either newly emerged or emerged in new places,...

    12/14/2016 - 05:30 Health, Microbiology, Science & Society
  • News

    Number of teens who report doing drugs falls in 2016

    Fewer teenagers in the United States used drugs in 2016 than in previous decades. The positive news comes from an annual survey of almost 45,500 U.S. students in grades eight, 10 and 12.

    “There’s a lot of good news here,” says pediatrician Sharon Levy of Boston Children’s Hospital. Public health messages from pediatricians, educators and others seem to be sinking in, she says. “I think...

    12/13/2016 - 18:12 Health, Science & Society
  • Feature

    Five challenges for self-driving cars

    Self-driving cars promise to transform roadways. There’d be fewer traffic accidents and jams, say proponents, and greater mobility for people who can’t operate a vehicle. The cars could fundamentally change the way we think about getting around.

    The technology is already rolling onto American streets: Uber has introduced self-driving cabs in Pittsburgh and is experimenting with self-...

    12/12/2016 - 09:00 Technology, Science & Society
  • News

    Zippy new jumping bot catches air again and again

    View the video

    Meet the robot that can do parkour.

    Salto, a lightweight bot that stands on one skinny leg like a flamingo, can leap from floor to wall, then off again — like parkour athletes bouncing between buildings, researchers from the University of California, Berkeley report December 6 in Science Robotics.

    Salto’s not the highest jumping robot out there, but it’s got...

    12/06/2016 - 14:00 Robotics, Technology
  • News

    Low social status leads to off-kilter immune system

    Living on the bottom rungs of the social ladder may be enough to make you sick. A new study manipulating the pecking order of monkeys finds that low social status kicks the immune system into high gear, leading to unwanted inflammation akin to that in people with chronic diseases.

    The new study, in the Nov. 25 Science, gets at an age-old question that’s been tough to study experimentally...

    11/24/2016 - 14:00 Health, Immune Science, Animals
  • News

    New era of human embryo gene editing begins

    A Swedish scientist is gene editing healthy human embryos, and he is probably not alone, researchers say.

    Chinese researchers have twice reported editing genes in human embryos that are unable to develop into a baby (SN Online: 4/6/16; SN Online: 4/23/15). But developmental biologist Fredrik Lanner of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm is the first researcher to publicly acknowledge...

    09/23/2016 - 16:30 Genetics, Science & Society
  • Feature

    Tenio Popmintchev fits X-ray laser on a tabletop

    Tenio Popmintchev, 39Laser physicistUniversity of Colorado Boulder

    Experimental physics is not for the fainthearted. One tiny error — or a concatenation of many — can keep a complicated experiment from working smoothly. Fortunately, Tenio Popmintchev has the tenacity for it.

    Popmintchev, a laser physicist at the JILA institute at the University of Colorado Boulder, thinks nothing...

    09/21/2016 - 11:03 Physics, Technology