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E.g., 06/19/2019
E.g., 06/19/2019
Your search has returned 38 images:
  • nanosponge
  • joshua tree
  • latest image of 2014 MU69 (Ultima Thule)
Your search has returned 168 articles:
  • Feature

    Nanosponges sop up toxins and help repair tissues

    To take his fledgling lab to new heights, Liangfang Zhang hatched a plan that he considered brilliant in its simplicity. It involved procedures that many of his peers found a little out there. But if he could make his idea work, it would clear a major hurdle to safely ferry therapies through the body on nanoparticles one-thousandth the width of a human hair.

    Yet back in 2010, the young...

    03/07/2019 - 07:00 Biomedicine, Technology
  • It's Alive

    Shutdown aside, Joshua trees live an odd life

    A year when vandals trashed a Joshua tree in a national park during a U.S. government shutdown is a good time to talk about what’s so unusual about these iconic plants.

    The trees’ chubby branches ending in rosettes of pointy green leaves add a touch of Dr. Seuss to the Mojave Desert in the U.S. Southwest. Its two species belong to the same family as agave and, believe it or not,...

    02/06/2019 - 08:00 Plants, Conservation, Science & Society
  • News

    Live updates: New Horizons’ flyby of a distant Kuiper Belt object

    Editor’s note: This story was updated December 31–January 1 with dispatches from astronomy writer Lisa Grossman, who was at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md., with the New Horizons team. 

    Updated 1:20 p.m., January 1

    The last best view of Ultima Thule that New Horizons sent back before last night’s flyby gave a rough view of the object...

    12/30/2018 - 06:00 Planetary Science
  • News

    Small doses of peanut protein can turn allergies around

    Carefully calibrated doses of peanut protein can turn extreme allergies around. At the end of a year of slowly increasing exposure, most children who started off severely allergic could eat the equivalent of two peanuts.

    That reversal, reported November 18 in the New England Journal of Medicine, “will be considered life-transforming for many families with a peanut allergy,” says...

    11/18/2018 - 16:45 Health
  • Feature

    Can science build a better burger?

    This isn’t as extreme as if the federal government had decided to regulate time travel. But it’s almost as surprising. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is taking the first step toward rules for growing nutritious, delicious, juicy meat in labs, not farms.

    The notion of growing, say, just the beef instead of the whole cow has been floating around since at least the 1890s. This sci-fi...

    09/20/2018 - 12:30 Agriculture, Climate, Sustainability, Nutrition
  • Feature

    What consumer DNA data can and can’t tell you about your risk for certain diseases

    Results from Family Tree DNA, a genetic testing company, helped Lara Diamond find a branch of her family she thought had been lost in the Holocaust. Those 2012 results brought dozens of new people into her life.

    Eager to find more relatives, Diamond, now 42, a professional genealogist in Baltimore, decided to try out all the companies that offer geneaological DNA testing to see what else...

    06/03/2018 - 06:00 Genetics
  • Growth Curve

    Finally, a plan on how to include pregnant women in clinical trials

    Among the stark changes for a woman during pregnancy is what she sees when she opens the medicine cabinet. The medications she wouldn’t have given a second thought to months earlier may now prompt worry and doubt. With any drug on the shelf, she may wonder: Is this medicine safe? Do I need to adjust the dose? Avoid it altogether? An expectant mom with just a cold or a headache will find drug...

    05/30/2018 - 07:00 Pregnancy, Health, Clinical Trials
  • Experiences

    What genetic tests from 23andMe, Veritas and Genos really told me about my health

    Direct-to-consumer genetic testing first came on the market about a decade ago, but I resisted the temptation to see what health information is hidden in my DNA — until now.

    As a molecular biology writer, I’ve been skeptical that the field of genetics is mature enough to accurately predict health (see related article). What finally motivated me to send away my DNA in the mail was the...

    05/22/2018 - 12:00 Genetics, Health
  • News

    FDA approves the first smallpox treatment

    Editor's note: The FDA approved TPOXX for the treatment of smallpox on July 13, 2018. This story, originally published May 2, has been edited throughout to reflect the approval.

    As bioterrorism fears grow, the first treatment for smallpox has been approved.

    Called tecovirimat, the drug stops the variola virus, which causes smallpox, from sending out copies of itself and infecting...

    05/02/2018 - 18:06 Health
  • News

    Slower speed, tricky turns give prey a chance against cheetahs and lions

    First, a note to any impala suddenly rushed by a cheetah: Do not — repeat, do not — just zoom straight off as fast as four hooves can carry you.

    The best escape move, according to analysis of the most detailed chase data yet from big cat predators, is some fluky turn, even though turning requires a slower stride. Swerve far enough, and the cheetah will be racing too fast to make the same...

    01/29/2018 - 10:00 Animals, Biophysics, Evolution