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E.g., 12/14/2017
E.g., 12/14/2017
Your search has returned 3 images:
  • Black-legged tick
  • Kobane, Syria
  • Handguns at a gun show in Las Vegas
Your search has returned 15 articles:
  • Feature

    Ticks are here to stay. But scientists are finding ways to outsmart them

    Thanks, Holly Gaff. Soon, anyone straining to tweeze off a mid-back tick can find answers to the obvious question: What if humankind just went after the little bloodsuckers with killer robots?

    Gaff, who calls herself a mathematical eco­epidemiologist, at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Va., is one of the few people collecting real field data on the efficacy of tick-slaying robots....

    08/09/2017 - 11:00 Animals, Science & Society
  • News

    Monitoring online groups offers insight into ISIS attacks

    Social media supporters of the Islamic State, or ISIS, form online groups that may provide clues crucial to predicting when terrorist attacks will take place, a new analysis finds.

    These virtual communities drive ISIS activity on a Facebook-like site called VKontakte, say physicist Neil Johnson of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla., and colleagues. VKontakte, a social...

    06/16/2016 - 14:21 Networks, Computing
  • Feature

    Gun research faces roadblocks and a dearth of data

    Buying a handgun in Connecticut means waiting — lots of waiting. First comes an eight-hour safety course. Then picking up an application at a local police department. Review of the application (which includes a background check and fingerprinting) can take up to eight weeks. If approved, the state issues a temporary permit, which the buyer trades in at state police headquarters for a permanent...

    05/03/2016 - 15:00 Science & Society, Mental Health, Health
  • News

    Scientists probe terrorist talk on 'Dark Web'

    VANCOUVER — Deep within the recesses of the Internet, extremists discuss and plot terrorist acts. But new mathematical tools that combine web crawling techniques, sophisticated algorithms and human expertise are gaining access to this “dark side” of the Web and may help predict and prevent violence.

    Researchers engaged in the “Dark Web Project,” a program started partly in response to...

    02/19/2012 - 20:52 Humans & Society, Numbers
  • Feature

    The Digital Camera Revolution

    Take a grainy, blurred image of a formless face or an illegible license plate, and with a few keystrokes the picture sharpens and the killer is caught — if you’re a crime-scene tech on TV. From Harrison Ford in Blade Runner to CSI, Criminal Minds and NCIS, the zoom-and-enhance maneuver has become such a staple of Hollywood dramas that it’s mocked with video montages on YouTube.

    ...
    01/13/2012 - 06:54
  • Science & the Public

    Airports’ leaden fallout may taint some kids

    People who live near airports serving small planes are exposed to lead from aviation fuel. A new study now links an airport’s proximity to slightly elevated blood-lead levels in children from area homes.

    Small planes (known in the trade as general aviation) tend to run on gasoline, most of which contains lead as an octane booster. These aircraft — used as taxis, personal aircraft and...

    07/14/2011 - 16:55 Technology, Humans & Society, Earth & Environment
  • News

    Inca cemetery holds brutal glimpses of Spanish violence

    If bones could scream, a bloodcurdling din would be reverberating through a 500-year-old cemetery in Peru. Human skeletons unearthed there have yielded the first direct evidence of Inca fatalities caused by Spanish conquerors.

    European newcomers killed some Inca individuals with guns, steel lances or hammers, and possibly light cannons, scientists report online in the...

    04/02/2010 - 13:31 Anthropology, Humans & Society
  • News

    Nobel Prize in chemistry commends finding and use of green fluorescent protein

    Making cells glow with a protein borrowed from jellyfish is one of the brightest ideas in chemistry. At least that is what the RoyalSwedishAcademy of Sciences implied when it announced October 8 that the 2008 Nobel Prize in chemistry would be awarded to three scientists who were instrumental in discovering green fluorescent protein, commonly called GFP, and developing the protein as a...

    10/08/2009 - 06:20 Chemistry, Genes & Cells
  • Letters to the Editor

    Letters from the November 11, 2006, issue of Science News

    The Carolinas to New Jersey

    "Bad-News Beauties: Poison-spined fish from Asia have invaded U.S. waters" (SN: 9/9/06, p. 168) cites evidence of a severe genetic bottleneck, suggesting that perhaps no more than three pregnant females launched the expanding western Atlantic red lionfish population. How can there be "pregnant females" in an animal with the external fertilization described in the...

    11/06/2006 - 13:06 Humans & Society
  • Feature

    That's One Weird Tooth

    What Martin Nweeia noticed first when he encountered narwhals, he says, was the sound. In May 2000, as spring was just reaching Baffin Island in the Canadian Arctic, a famed local hunter took Nweeia out on the ice searching the open water for those tusk-bearing, high-Arctic whales. "I was sitting on a bucket out on the ice doing polar bear watch," he says. At that time of year, daylight lasts...

    03/21/2006 - 14:43 Animals