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  • News

    Cancer studies get mixed grades on redo tests

    An effort to reproduce findings of five prominent cancer studies has produced a mixed bag of results.

    In a series of papers published January 19 in eLife, researchers from the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology report that none of five prominent cancer studies they sought to duplicate were completely reproducible. Replicators could not confirm any of the findings of one study. In...

    01/18/2017 - 16:42 Science & Society, Cancer
  • Feature

    The Digital Camera Revolution

    Take a grainy, blurred image of a formless face or an illegible license plate, and with a few keystrokes the picture sharpens and the killer is caught — if you’re a crime-scene tech on TV. From Harrison Ford in Blade Runner to CSI, Criminal Minds and NCIS, the zoom-and-enhance maneuver has become such a staple of Hollywood dramas that it’s mocked with video montages on YouTube.

    ...
    01/13/2012 - 06:54
  • Feature

    Software Scientist

    Games such as chess have long been mastered by thinking machines. But weightier intellectual feats, such as deducing the laws of nature, have remained the domain of living, breathing brainiacs — until now.

    A new computer program called Eureqa comes up with fundamental mathematical laws, the great equations of textbooks and history, from scratch. Feed Eureqa a mess of raw...

    12/30/2011 - 09:46 Technology
  • News

    Nobel Prize in chemistry commends finding and use of green fluorescent protein

    Making cells glow with a protein borrowed from jellyfish is one of the brightest ideas in chemistry. At least that is what the RoyalSwedishAcademy of Sciences implied when it announced October 8 that the 2008 Nobel Prize in chemistry would be awarded to three scientists who were instrumental in discovering green fluorescent protein, commonly called GFP, and developing the protein as a...

    10/08/2009 - 06:20 Chemistry, Other, Genes & Cells
  • News

    More problems with Hubble

    Two anomalies onboard the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope, which stopped transmitting data on September 27, caused engineers to suspend re-activation of Hubble’s science equipment. Engineers encountered problems following an intricate maneuver to circumvent a piece of failed hardware. Hubble is currently orbiting Earth in a dormant “safe mode” while the malfunctions are assessed.

    In an...

    10/17/2008 - 16:49 Atom & Cosmos
  • News

    Crowcam: Camera on bird's tail captures bird ingenuity

    Biologists studying tool use in a tropical crow species have fastened tiny video cameras to the birds and recorded their search for food.

    "We are the first ones to do this on wild birds," says Christian Rutz of the University of Oxford in England. He and his Oxford colleagues attached cameras to the tail feathers of New Caledonian crows so that the devices look...

    10/03/2007 - 13:56 Animals
  • Feature

    Science News of the Year 2005

    Science News of Yesteryear

    Anthropology & Archaeology

    Astronomy

    Behavior

    Biomedicine

    Botany & Zoology

    Cell & Molecular Biology

    Chemistry

    ...
    12/20/2005 - 03:53 Humans & Society
  • Feature

    Comeback Bird

    During the last week of April, an e-mail zinging through the bird-watcher community spilled the beans on one of the biggest and best-kept secrets in ornithology. It proclaimed that North America's famed ivory-billed woodpecker was not extinct after all, but Terry Rich of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service wasn't excited. He had heard that story too many times before. Since the last widely...

    06/06/2005 - 09:54 Animals
  • Feature

    Digital Cells

    Imagine a future in which a single drop of water holds a veritable army of living robots; in which people download software updates not for their computers, but for their bacteria; and in which specially programmed cells course through a person's arteries, monitoring blood sugar concentrations and keeping an eye out for cholesterol buildups.

    These...

    04/21/2003 - 10:56 Technology
  • News

    Deadly Stowaways: Seeds of cancer in transplant recipients are traced back to donors

    An organ transplant gives many people a second chance at life, but the harsh drugs required for staving off immune rejection of the new tissues seem to hike a recipient's risk of cancer. For someone desperately in need of a heart or liver, this drawback represents a gamble worth taking.

    Scientists initially considered this boost in cancer risk to be the result of a suppressed immune...

    04/09/2003 - 12:17 Biomedicine