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E.g., 11/22/2017
E.g., 11/22/2017
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  • Pluto
  • illustration of New Horizons journey to Pluto
Your search has returned 11 articles:
  • Feature

    Year in review: Pluto unveiled as a world like no other

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    Mountains of water ice tower thousands of meters over fields of frozen nitrogen and methane. Glaciers etched with channels hint at heat bubbling up from below. A patchwork of new and old terrains — some laid down in the last 10 million years, some as old as the planet itself — blanket the ground. And what appear to be two ice volcanoes punch through the terrain.

    The...

    12/15/2015 - 07:05 Planetary Science
  • Feature

    Rendezvous with Pluto

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    Tiny, far-flung Pluto is about to have a visitor — at least for a few hours.

    On July 14, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft will reach the dwarf planet and try to learn all it can about Pluto and its five known moons. Then the probe will leave Pluto behind, vanishing into the frigid darkness beyond the planets.

    In its wake, New Horizons will introduce Earth to the...

    06/12/2015 - 11:55 Planetary Science, Astronomy
  • On the Scene

    Sometimes, happiness is for bozos

    SAN ANTONIO— In a midtown-Manhattan psychotherapist’s office, a new client adjusts his floppy, glow-in-the-dark shoes and nervously tugs at his multicolored shock of hair before starting to talk.

    You might recognize me, doc. I’m Bozo. Bozo the Clown.

    The circus is in town? How’d you get here today — cannon shot?

    Spare me, doc. This is serious. I’ve lost my happiness. I’ve...

    02/02/2011 - 13:13 Psychology, Humans & Society
  • Feature

    Danger in the Air

    On Dec. 15, 1989, KLM flight 867 from Amsterdam was approaching its destination in Anchorage, Alaska, when the plane flew into what appeared to be a thin layer of normal clouds. Suddenly, according to flight-crew reports, it got very dark outside and the air in the cockpit filled with a brownish dust and the unmistakable smell of sulfur. One minute after beginning a high-power climb to escape...

    09/08/2009 - 10:14 Earth
  • Feature

    Science News of the Year 2005

    Science News of Yesteryear

    Anthropology & Archaeology

    Astronomy

    Behavior

    Biomedicine

    Botany & Zoology

    Cell & Molecular Biology

    Chemistry

    ...
    12/20/2005 - 03:53 Humans & Society
  • Feature

    Images from the Edge

    David Schiminovich stared at a gallery of spiral galaxies as though he had never seen anything like them before. Indeed, no one had. He sat downloading the newly collected images in a narrow room overlooking a cavernous space at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. In that space, the mirror for the Palomar Telescope—until the mid 1970s, the world's largest telescope—had been...

    02/15/2005 - 18:19 Astronomy
  • Feature

    Infrasonic Symphony

    "Let me start off with a riddle," says NASA scientist Allan J. Zuckerwar. In his office in Hampton, Va., he rattles off items as dissimilar as rhinoceroses, supersonic aircraft, and hurricanes. "Now, what do they have in common?" The answer, Zuckerwar explains, is that each one generates silent infrasound—long sound waves at a frequency below 20 hertz. People can't hear anything below that...

    01/03/2004 - 14:55 Earth
  • Feature

    Great Computations

    Computers at home or in the office often sit idle for minutes, hours, or days at a time. The Internet now allows researchers to take advantage of this enormous reservoir of unused computer power.

    More than 1.6 million people have downloaded software to sift through signals collected by the Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico as part of a search for signs of intelligent...

    09/06/2002 - 17:54 Numbers
  • Feature

    Mining the Sky

    The next really big observatory won't sit on a mountaintop or out in the desert. Nor will it fly aboard a spacecraft.

    Astronomers seeking the best views of the heavens have traditionally trekked to such remote outposts as the top of an extinct volcano in Hawaii or a desert in northern Chile. When they have needed to observe, say, one patch of sky over a broad range...

    02/23/2001 - 10:43 Astronomy
  • Feature

    Front Matter

    05/24/1997 - 00:00