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  • Nudge
  • doctor talking to a father
Your search has returned 10 articles:
  • Feature

    Nudging people to make good choices can backfire

    Nudges are a growth industry. Inspired by a popular line of psychological research and introduced in a best-selling book a decade ago, these inexpensive behavior changers are currently on a roll.

    Policy makers throughout the world, guided by behavioral scientists, are devising ways to steer people toward decisions deemed to be in their best interests. These simple interventions don’t...

    03/08/2017 - 08:00 Psychology, Science & Society
  • Letters to the Editor

    Lucy's new neighbor, downloading New Horizon's data and more reader feedback

    New Horizons phones home

    In “Pluto: Explored” (SN: 6/27/15, p. 16), Christopher Crockett chronicled New Horizons’ long journey to the dwarf planet. He followed up with a report on the successful flyby in “Pluto’s icy landscape comes into view” (SN: 8/8/15, p. 6).

    “Having read that early images of Pluto encoded in radio waves would take 4.5 hours to reach Earth from the New Horizons space...

    08/12/2015 - 13:56 Astronomy, Neuroscience, Human Evolution
  • Scicurious

    There’s more than one way to persuade people to vaccinate

    Measles used to sound like such an old-fashioned disease. But the current Disneyland measles outbreak has put it back in the news, with 141 cases reported so far this year in 17 states and the District of Columbia. While the outbreak has some parents who formerly delayed or refused to vaccinate racing to the clinic, others are becoming more entrenched in their belief that vaccination is both...

    02/19/2015 - 16:14 Health
  • Feature

    A mind for music

    Read features from the special edition Articles in A mind for music. | GoDownload a PDF of the special edition Exclusive for Science News subscribers.Download | Subscribe

    There are very few activities for which your birthday suit and a three-piece suit are equally appropriate attire. Music is one of them.

    Belting an improvised ditty alone in the shower and performing Handel’s “...

    07/30/2010 - 14:25
  • News

    Nobel Prize in chemistry commends finding and use of green fluorescent protein

    Making cells glow with a protein borrowed from jellyfish is one of the brightest ideas in chemistry. At least that is what the RoyalSwedishAcademy of Sciences implied when it announced October 8 that the 2008 Nobel Prize in chemistry would be awarded to three scientists who were instrumental in discovering green fluorescent protein, commonly called GFP, and developing the protein as a...

    10/08/2009 - 06:20 Chemistry, Other, Genes & Cells
  • Math Trek

    Shuffling the cards: Math does the trick

    Here’s the rule: To assure cards get sufficiently mixed up, shuffle a deck about seven times. Mathematician, magician and card shark Persi Diaconis of Stanford University, along with David Bayer of Columbia University, created shock waves in Las Vegas when he figured that out back in 1992. Most dealers had been shuffling much less.

    But now Diaconis and his colleagues are issuing...

    11/07/2008 - 15:42 Numbers
  • News

    Salmon study: Dammed or not

    There could be little difference in how young salmon survive their journey down a free-flowing river versus the heavily dammed Columbia River system, says a controversial new study.

    A new system for tagging small fish allows biologists to monitor young salmon migration survival in a big, undammed river for the first time, David Welch of Kintama Research Corporation...

    10/27/2008 - 18:57 Life & Evolution, Other
  • News

    A new test for Alzheimer's risk?

    Failures in visual short-term memory of objects, what scientists call "iconic memory," could reveal people at risk of Alzheimer's disease, a new study finds. Iconic memory is the image that lingers in the mind's eye after a person sees something briefly.

    To find out whether iconic memories are lost more readily in people with mild cognitive impairments—which include slightly diminished...

    02/01/2005 - 10:11 Other
  • News

    Gender Neutral: Men, women face same cancer risk from smoking

    Over the past decade, the scientific community has turned up conflicting evidence regarding whether cigarettes impart a greater risk of lung cancer to women than to men. In the largest comparison to date, researchers now report that the sexes share a roughly equal risk of developing the cancer from smoking.

    The scientists also analyzed data from six other studies and arrived at the same...

    06/02/2004 - 10:22 Biomedicine
  • Feature

    Fit for a King

    05/18/1996 - 00:00