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E.g., 06/23/2018
E.g., 06/23/2018
Your search has returned 5 images:
  • smartphone illustration
  • Handguns at a gun show in Las Vegas
  • Pluto's mountains
Your search has returned 11 articles:
  • Feature

    Your phone is like a spy in your pocket

    Consider everything your smartphone has done for you today. Counted your steps? Deposited a check? Transcribed notes? Navigated you somewhere new?

    Smartphones make for such versatile pocket assistants because they’re equipped with a suite of sensors, including some we may never think — or even know — about, sensing, for example, light, humidity, pressure and temperature.

    Because...

    01/23/2018 - 12:00 Computing, Technology
  • Feature

    Gun research faces roadblocks and a dearth of data

    Buying a handgun in Connecticut means waiting — lots of waiting. First comes an eight-hour safety course. Then picking up an application at a local police department. Review of the application (which includes a background check and fingerprinting) can take up to eight weeks. If approved, the state issues a temporary permit, which the buyer trades in at state police headquarters for a permanent...

    05/03/2016 - 15:00 Science & Society, Mental Health, Health
  • News

    Mission to Pluto: Live coverage

    The New Horizons spacecraft flew by Pluto at 7:49 a.m. EDT on July 14, 2015. Astronomy writer Christopher Crockett wrote several updates from mission control at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab in Laurel, Md., from July 12-15, and reviewed some of the mission's major milestones from the last several months. Check our Mission to Pluto editor’s pick for the latest on New Horizons...

    07/15/2015 - 17:39 Planetary Science
  • Feature

    Rendezvous with Pluto

    View timeline

    Tiny, far-flung Pluto is about to have a visitor — at least for a few hours.

    On July 14, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft will reach the dwarf planet and try to learn all it can about Pluto and its five known moons. Then the probe will leave Pluto behind, vanishing into the frigid darkness beyond the planets.

    In its wake, New Horizons will introduce Earth to the...

    06/12/2015 - 11:55 Planetary Science, Astronomy
  • Feature

    Deep network

    Gas bubbles effervesce from a mound of muck on the seafloor in a deep submarine canyon off the west coast of Canada. Microbes beneath the sediment belch the bubbles after feasting on the ancient remains of algae, sea critters and their poop: a primordial stew that’s been simmering since long before humans walked the Earth.

    This gassy oasis attracts an odd collection of critters. Worms...

    10/04/2013 - 15:00 Earth, Technology
  • News

    Salmon study: Dammed or not

    There could be little difference in how young salmon survive their journey down a free-flowing river versus the heavily dammed Columbia River system, says a controversial new study.

    A new system for tagging small fish allows biologists to monitor young salmon migration survival in a big, undammed river for the first time, David Welch of Kintama...

    10/27/2008 - 18:57 Life & Evolution
  • News

    Bat that roared

    Bats using sound to find their way in the dark boom louder than home fire alarms and rock concerts, according to new measurements.

    Fortunately all that noise stays at frequencies too high for human hearing, or bats would drive people batty.

    Measurements of sounds from 11 species of tropical bats revealed that all animals emitted extremely loud sounds,...

    04/30/2008 - 10:32 Life & Evolution
  • Feature

    Science News of the Year 2005

    Science News of Yesteryear

    Anthropology & Archaeology

    Astronomy

    Behavior

    Biomedicine

    Botany & Zoology

    Cell & Molecular...

    12/20/2005 - 03:53 Humans & Society
  • Feature

    Building a Supermodel

    More than 1,800 years ago, the Greek physician Galen came up with a model for how the human body works. Blood, which he called the "natural spirit," originated in the liver and traveled to all parts of the body through the veins. In the left side of the heart, some of the blood mixed with air from the lungs to make "vital spirit," which flowed to all parts of the body through the arteries....

    06/21/2002 - 16:13 Technology
  • Feature

    Mining the Sky

    The next really big observatory won't sit on a mountaintop or out in the desert. Nor will it fly aboard a spacecraft.

    Astronomers seeking the best views of the heavens have traditionally trekked to such remote outposts as the top of an extinct volcano in Hawaii or a desert in northern Chile. When they have needed to observe, say, one patch of sky over...

    02/23/2001 - 10:43 Astronomy