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E.g., 09/23/2017
E.g., 09/23/2017
Your search has returned 3 images:
  • Black-legged tick
  • doing experiments
Your search has returned 7 articles:
  • Feature

    Ticks are here to stay. But scientists are finding ways to outsmart them

    Thanks, Holly Gaff. Soon, anyone straining to tweeze off a mid-back tick can find answers to the obvious question: What if humankind just went after the little bloodsuckers with killer robots?

    Gaff, who calls herself a mathematical eco­epidemiologist, at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Va., is one of the few people collecting real field data on the efficacy of tick-slaying robots....

    08/09/2017 - 11:00 Animals, Science & Society
  • News

    Cancer studies get mixed grades on redo tests

    An effort to reproduce findings of five prominent cancer studies has produced a mixed bag of results.

    In a series of papers published January 19 in eLife, researchers from the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology report that none of five prominent cancer studies they sought to duplicate were completely reproducible. Replicators could not confirm any of the findings of one study. In...

    01/18/2017 - 16:42 Science & Society, Cancer
  • Feature

    The long and winding Colorado

    Standing on a mesa high above the town of Rifle, Colo., Andres Aslan is having a hard time staying quiet. The lanky geologist from nearby Colorado Mesa University normally speaks in a low-key professorial drone. But here, looking down at a sprawling river valley blazing with autumnal cottonwoods, his enthusiasm cranks up his volume. “This could be it,” says Aslan, gesticulating wildly. “This...

    01/10/2014 - 14:00 Earth, Planetary Science
  • Food for Thought

    How Advertising Is Becoming Child's Play

    Not long ago, food advertising appeared primarily in newspapers, magazines, and television. Today, though, manufacturers are embracing new media to ever more effectively target their youngest consumers: children. A new study conducted for the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation analyzes how these companies are feeding their messages to tots.

    The number of Web sites hosting pages for...

    07/27/2006 - 14:57 Biomedicine
  • Feature

    Violent Developments

    Henry was headed for serious trouble. The 15-year-old provoked an endless series of fights at school and frequently bullied girls. Teachers regularly suspended him for his classroom disruptions. Older students taunted Henry in the hallways by calling him a sexual pervert or jeered him for having been held back in kindergarten. At home, his father browbeat and denigrated the boy, while his...

    05/23/2006 - 09:53
  • Feature

    Science News of the Year 2005

    Science News of Yesteryear

    Anthropology & Archaeology

    Astronomy

    Behavior

    Biomedicine

    Botany & Zoology

    Cell & Molecular Biology

    Chemistry

    ...
    12/20/2005 - 03:53 Humans & Society
  • News

    Network Inoculation: Antivirus shield would outrace cyber infections

    The best way to stop an epidemic might be to start one. That's the gist of a new strategy against computer viruses that was just unveiled by Israeli researchers. In their theoretical approach, when a computer network detects a new virus, it launches an internal counter-epidemic of self-propagating, protective messages. Upon receiving such a message, an uncontaminated computer immunizes itself...

    11/30/2005 - 09:55 Computing