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E.g., 12/16/2017
E.g., 12/16/2017
Your search has returned 3219 images:
  • CT scans of Homo sapiens fossils
  • neuron illustration
  • neutron star collision
Your search has returned 101554 articles:
  • Year in Review

    The story of humans’ origins got a revision in 2017

    Human origins are notoriously tough to pin down. Fossil and genetic studies in 2017 suggested a reason why: No clear starting time or location ever existed for our species. The first biological stirrings of humankind occurred at a time of evolutionary experimentation in the human genus, Homo.

    Homo sapiens’ signature skeletal features emerged piece by piece in different African...

    12/13/2017 - 08:29 Human Evolution, Ancestry, Archaeology
  • News

    New setup for image recognition AI lets a program think on its feet

    Artificial intelligence is getting some better perspective. Like a person who can read someone else’s penmanship without studying lots of handwriting samples, next-gen image recognition AI can more easily identify familiar sights in new situations.

    Made from a new type of virtual building block called capsules, these programs may cut down the enormous amount of data needed to train...

    12/04/2017 - 08:00 Artificial Intelligence, Computing, Technology
  • News

    Collision illuminates the mysterious makeup of neutron stars

    On astrophysicists’ charts of star stuff, there’s a substance that still merits the label “here be dragons.” That poorly understood material is found inside neutron stars — the collapsed remnants of once-mighty stars — and is now being mapped out, as scientists better characterize the weird matter.

    The detection of two colliding neutron stars, announced in October (SN: 11/11/17, p. 6),...

    12/01/2017 - 07:00 Physics, Astronomy
  • News

    Bats in China carry all the ingredients to make a new SARS virus

    Viruses in bats may have mixed and matched genes to create the virus that gave rise to the deadly SARS outbreak in 2003, a new study suggests. And it could happen again. All of the ingredients needed to create a new SARS virus are found among viruses currently infecting horseshoe bats, researchers report November 30 in PLOS Pathogens.

    The viruses “are poised to cause future outbreaks,”...

    11/30/2017 - 14:00 Genetics, Microbiology, Animals
  • News

    Jackpot of fossilized pterosaur eggs unearthed in China

    Hundreds of eggs belonging to a species of flying reptile that lived alongside dinosaurs are giving scientists a peek into the earliest development of the animals.

    The find includes at least 16 partial embryos, several still preserved in 3-D. Those embryos suggest that the animals were able to walk, but not fly, soon after hatching, researchers report in the Dec. 1 Science.

    Led by...

    11/30/2017 - 14:00 Animals, Paleontology
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers debate ethics of resurrecting extinct species

    Culture club

    The book Rise of the Necrofauna tackles the challenges of using gene-editing tools to bring woolly mammoths and other long-gone species back from the dead. These “de-extincted” creatures would have to contend with a radically changed world that includes new habitats and diseases, Tina Hesman Saey wrote in her review “Resurrecting extinct species raises ethical questions” (SN: 10/28...

    11/29/2017 - 15:36 Evolution, Science & Society
  • Feature

    Scientists are seeking new strategies to fight multiple sclerosis

    James Davis used to be an avid outdoorsman. He surfed, hiked, skateboarded and rock climbed. Today, the 48-year-old from Albuquerque barely gets out of bed. He has the most severe form of multiple sclerosis, known as primary progressive MS, a worsening disease that destroys the central nervous system. Diagnosed in May 2011, Davis relied on a wheelchair within six months. He can no longer get...

    11/29/2017 - 15:30 Neuroscience, Immune Science, Health
  • News

    Testosterone may be one reason why men don’t get asthma as much as women

    Testosterone may tamp down asthma caused by inhaling pollen, dust or other airborne allergens. That’s partly why more women suffer from the lung disease than men, new research suggests.

    The male sex hormone acts on a group of immune cells that are part of the first line of the body’s defense against invaders. These cells are thought to kick-start inflammation in the lungs, which causes...

    11/28/2017 - 17:32 Health, Cells, Immune Science
  • News

    Most blue whales are ‘righties,’ except for this one move

    View the video

    Blue whales, it turns out, are a tad ambidextrous.

    When hunting in deep water, the whales tend to be “right-handed,” lunging at krill while twisting 180 degrees or less onto their right side. But when gobbling up the tiny crustaceans near the surface, the whales tend to be lefties, launching themselves upward while performing a 360-degree barrel roll to the left,...

    11/28/2017 - 14:00 Animals, Oceans, Ecology
  • News in Brief

    In the deep ocean, these bacteria play a key role in trapping carbon

    A mysterious group of microbes may be controlling the fate of carbon in the dark depths of the world’s oceans.

    Nitrospinae bacteria, which use the nitrogen compound nitrite to “fix” inorganic carbon dioxide into sugars and other compounds for food and reproduction, are responsible for 15 to 45 percent of such carbon fixation in the western North Atlantic Ocean, researchers report in the...

    11/28/2017 - 11:00 Oceans, Climate, Microbes