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  • Black-legged tick
  • hydra
  • Handguns at a gun show in Las Vegas
Your search has returned 68 articles:
  • Feature

    Ticks are here to stay. But scientists are finding ways to outsmart them

    Thanks, Holly Gaff. Soon, anyone straining to tweeze off a mid-back tick can find answers to the obvious question: What if humankind just went after the little bloodsuckers with killer robots?

    Gaff, who calls herself a mathematical eco­epidemiologist, at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Va., is one of the few people collecting real field data on the efficacy of tick-slaying robots....

    08/09/2017 - 11:00 Animals, Science & Society
  • Feature

    Organisms age in myriad ways — and some might not even bother

    The scene was stranger than it looked, even by Las Vegas standards: Two young men pull up in a U-Haul truck to a motel outside the city. They check in and move a cooler into their room. They appear to be handling something of importance, and look to see if the ice needs replenishing. Inside the cooler is not the makings of epic hangovers but instead an experiment in eternal youth.

    Tucked...

    07/13/2016 - 11:09 Animals, Evolution, Plants
  • Feature

    Gun research faces roadblocks and a dearth of data

    Buying a handgun in Connecticut means waiting — lots of waiting. First comes an eight-hour safety course. Then picking up an application at a local police department. Review of the application (which includes a background check and fingerprinting) can take up to eight weeks. If approved, the state issues a temporary permit, which the buyer trades in at state police headquarters for a permanent...

    05/03/2016 - 15:00 Science & Society, Mental Health, Health
  • Feature

    Sam Ting tries to expose dark matter's mysteries

    In the near vacuum of outer space, each rare morsel of matter tells a story. A speedy proton may have been propelled by the shock wave of an exploding star. A stray electron may have teetered on the precipice of a black hole, only to be flung away in a powerful jet of searing gas.

    Since 2011, the International Space Station has housed an experiment that aims to decipher those origin...

    03/06/2015 - 12:27 Particle Physics, Cosmology
  • Feature

    Is redoing scientific research the best way to find truth?

    R. Allan Mufson remembers the alarming letters from physicians. They were testing a drug intended to help cancer patients by boosting levels of oxygen-carrying hemoglobin in their blood.

    In animal studies and early clinical trials, the drug known as Epo (for erythropoietin) appeared to counteract anemia caused by radiation and chemotherapy. It had the potential to spare patients from the...

    01/13/2015 - 13:23 Science & Society
  • Growth Curve

    Baby-cam captures an infant’s world

    If you’re curious about what your cat sees all day, you can strap a cat-cam to its collar. The tiny video camera assumes the vantage point of the cat as it swishes through tall grass, sits at the window and laps up water. These cameras aren’t just for kitties, either. The artist Sam Easterson has used the tiny head-mounted cameras to capture the perspectives of turkeys, tarantulas, buffalo,...

    01/13/2014 - 17:52 Child Development
  • Feature

    When Networks Network

    Half a dozen times each night, your slumbering body performs a remarkable feat of coordination.

    During the deepest throes of sleep, the body’s support systems run on their own timetables. Nerve cells hum along in your brain, their chitchat generating slow waves that signal sleep’s nether stages. Yet, like buses and trains with overlapping routes but...

    09/07/2012 - 10:39 Networks
  • News

    Flower sharing may be unsafe for bees

    Eleven species of wild pollinators in the United States have turned up carrying some of the viruses known to menace domestic honeybees, possibly picked up via flower pollen.

    Most of these native pollinators haven’t been recorded with honeybee viruses before, according to Diana Cox-Foster of Penn State University in University Park. The new analysis raises the specter of...

    12/24/2010 - 10:37 Life & Evolution, Earth & Environment, Agriculture
  • News

    Forensics’ next tool: Hair-collecting caterpillars

    RENO, Nev. — Clothes moths will eat more than our wardrobe. Given a chance, they'll eat us too.

    Casemaking clothes moth caterpillars can digest human hair and will feed on corpses. But it's not all bad news, scientists say.

    Hair bits nipped off of corpses by caterpillars of the casemaking clothes moth, Tinea pellionella, can yield enough DNA to identify the deceased,...

    11/18/2008 - 09:44 Animals, Other, Life & Evolution
  • News

    New arthropod species really stuck together

    A new fossil find reveals that in an ancient arthropod species, no animal was an island.

    The discovery of 525-million-year-old fossils belonging to a new species of arthropod shows that these animals formed communal chains never before seen in fossilized invertebrates, scientists report in the Oct. 10 Science.

    These arthropods, a phylum that includes lobsters, beetles and...

    10/09/2008 - 12:52 Paleontology