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Your search has returned 1433 articles:
  • News

    Out-of-body experiments show kids’ budding sense of self

    Kids can have virtual out-of-body experiences as early as age 6. Oddly enough, the ability to inhabit a virtual avatar signals a budding sense that one’s self is located in one’s own body, researchers say.

    Grade-schoolers were stroked on their backs with a stick while viewing virtual versions of themselves undergoing the same touch. Just after the session ended, the children often...

    04/03/2017 - 16:15 Psychology
  • News in Brief

    Baby starfish on the hunt whip up whirlpools

    A baby starfish scoops up snacks by spinning miniature whirlpools. These vortices draw in tasty algae so the larva can slurp them up, scientists from Stanford University report December 19 in Nature Physics.

    Before starfish take on their familiar shape, they swim the ocean as millimeter-sized larvae. They use hairlike appendages called cilia to paddle. The larvae also adjust the...

    12/23/2016 - 12:00 Biophysics
  • Screentime

    Interactive map reveals hidden details of the Milky Way

    There’s much more to the universe than meets the eye, and a new web-based app lets you explore just how much our eyes are missing. Gleamoscope presents the night sky across a range of electromagnetic frequencies. Spots of gamma rays pinpoint distant feeding black holes. Tendrils of dust glow with infrared light throughout the Milky Way. A supernova remnant — the site of a star that exploded...

    11/14/2016 - 15:35 Astronomy
  • Feature

    For robots, artificial intelligence gets physical

    View the video

    In a high-ceilinged laboratory at Children’s National Health System in Washington, D.C., a gleaming white robot stitches up pig intestines.

    The thin pink tissue dangles like a deflated balloon from a sturdy plastic loop. Two bulky cameras watch from above as the bot weaves green thread in and out, slowly sewing together two sections. Like an experienced human surgeon...

    11/02/2016 - 17:16 Robotics, Science & Society
  • News

    Be careful what you say around jumping spiders

    Accidental chair squeaks in a lab have tipped off researchers to a new world of eavesdroppers.

    Spiders don’t have eardrums, though their exquisitely sensitive leg hairs pick up vibrations humming through solids like web silk and leaves. Biologists thought that any airborne sounds more than a few centimeters away would be inaudible. But the first recordings of auditory nerve cells firing...

    10/15/2016 - 08:00 Animals, Neuroscience
  • Feature

    Lawrence David’s gut check gets personal

    Lawrence David, 33Computational biologistDuke University

    A Jim Carrey movie inspired computational biologist Lawrence David to change the course of his research. As a graduate student, David saw Yes Man, a 2008 film in which Carrey’s character is forced to say yes to all propositions.

    David thought the movie’s message about opening yourself to new experiences, even uncomfortable ones,...

    09/21/2016 - 11:06 Human Evolution, Microbes, Cells
  • News

    See where Clinton and Trump stand on science

    Hillary Clinton’s “I believe in science” declaration aside, science has not played a starring role in the 2016 presidential election. Far from it. For the most part, the candidates’ science policies have trickled out in dribs and drabs, and in varying degrees of detail — talking points on a website here, a passing comment in response to a spur-of-the-moment question there.

    Yet science...

    09/13/2016 - 12:25 Science & Society
  • Feature

    Fish escapes from marine farms raise concerns about wildlife

    On the dock in Buenaventura, Colombia, the fisherman needed help identifying his catch. “I don’t have any clue what this is,” he said, holding a roughly 50-centimeter-long, grayish-brown fish. Gustavo Castellanos-Galindo, a fish ecologist, recalls the conversation from last October. “I said, ‘Well, this is a cobia, and it shouldn’t be here.’ ”

    The juvenile cobia had probably escaped from...

    09/07/2016 - 16:12 Oceans, Ecosystems, Agriculture
  • News

    Astronomers prepare for 2017 solar eclipse spectacle

    Eeriness creeps in. Colors change and shadows sharpen. The last minutes before a total solar eclipse trigger a primal reaction in the human psyche, says astronomer Jay Pasachoff.

    “You don’t know what’s going on,” says Pasachoff, of Williams College in Williamstown, Mass. “But you know something is wrong.”

    Millions of people will know something is wrong on August 21, 2017, when a...

    08/16/2016 - 06:00 Astronomy
  • Feature

    The brain’s blueprint for aging is set early in life

    If you’ve ever watched a baby purse her lips to hoot for the first time, or flash a big, gummy grin when she sees you, or surprise herself by rolling over, you’ve glimpsed the developing brain in action. A baby’s brain constructs itself into something that controls the body, learns and connects socially.

    Spending time with an older person, you may notice signs of slippage. An elderly man...

    07/13/2016 - 11:10 Neuroscience, Health