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  • Mars
  • Mars’ volcano-filled Tharsis region
  • map of craters on moon's surface
Your search has returned 114 articles:
  • News

    Mars may not have been born alongside the other rocky planets

    Mars may have had a far-out birthplace.

    Simulating the assembly of the solar system around 4.56 billion years ago, researchers propose that the Red Planet didn’t form in the inner solar system alongside the other terrestrial planets as previously thought. Mars instead may have formed around where the asteroid belt is now and migrated inward to its present-day orbit, the scientists report...

    05/05/2017 - 07:00 Planetary Science, Astronomy
  • News

    Red Planet’s interior may not churn much

    An enduring source of magma on Mars fueled volcanic eruptions for billions of years, clues inside a rock flung from the Red Planet reveal.

    The newfound rock belongs to a batch of meteorites called shergottites that originated from the same Martian volcanic system, researchers report February 1 in Science Advances. But the new rock is considerably older than its counterparts. While...

    02/01/2017 - 14:00 Planetary Science
  • Science Visualized

    Surprising number of meteoroids hit moon’s surface

    The moon is one tough satellite. With no atmosphere, it endures a barrage of incoming asteroids and comets that pit its surface with a constellation of craters. A new map (above) reveals 222 recent impact craters (in yellow), 33 percent more than simulations predicted. Scientists spotted the features by analyzing about 14,000 pairs of before-and-after images captured by the Lunar...

    11/16/2016 - 08:00 Astronomy
  • News in Brief

    Glimpse of baby planet shows what to expect when a star is expecting

    Like a cosmic sonogram, new images showcase an infant world growing in the planetary womb that encircles a young star. This is the first time researchers have observed a young planet actively feeding from the disk of gas in which it lives.

    Light from hydrogen gas swirling around the planet gave the baby world away, researchers report November 18 in Nature. The glowing hydrogen is baked...

    11/18/2015 - 13:36 Planetary Science
  • News

    Subsurface sea hides below ice of Saturn moon

    Scuba divers take note: an underground ocean awaits on a moon of Saturn. Astronomers have, for the first time, measured the depth and extent of a subsurface sea on the ice-covered moon Enceladus. The findings shore up the notion that an underground reservoir feeds the moon’s ice geysers and raise questions about Enceladus’ habitability.

    For a long time, astronomers thought the 500-...

    04/03/2014 - 14:00 Planetary Science, Astrobiology, Astronomy
  • Feature

    Life under ice

    Even by Antarctic standards, the Lake Vostok research station is inhospitable. The outpost at the heart of the frozen continent holds the record for the lowest naturally occurring temperature ever observed on Earth. Scientists commonly describe the place as punishing, unforgiving, the most desolate place on the planet.

    That’s nothing. Nearly 4,000 meters below the...

    08/23/2013 - 12:00 Earth
  • Feature

    Rock, Rattle and Roll

    Most scientists don’t wear protective headgear while giving talks. Then again, most scientists aren’t the target of pastry-wielding colleagues.

    But last October, when astronomer Hal Levison presented what he called a “slightly radical” mechanism for building the solar system’s giant planets, he was ready.

    “I’m really a little intimidated about...

    04/20/2012 - 10:12
  • Feature

    Fertile Frontiers

    The solar system’s spotted bully and its ringed sidekick are holding some tantalizing treasures in their gravitational clutches. Circling Jupiter and Saturn are more than a hundred moons, including some of the most promising hosts for extraterrestrial life in the solar system.

    But not every one of these moons is an equal opportunity extraterrestrial petri dish....

    09/23/2011 - 10:30 Planetary Science, Astronomy
  • News

    Pacific volcanoes share split personality

    Hawaii’s scenic volcanoes come in two chemical flavors, and now scientists think the igneous peaks on several other Pacific island chains do, too.

    Two parallel lines of volcanoes stretch from the Big Island of Hawaii in the southeast to Molokai in the northwest.  Volcanoes on the Samoan and Marquesas islands are similarly paired. A new study finds that, as in Hawaii, one row is...

    09/19/2011 - 11:07 Earth, Earth & Environment
  • Feature

    Death of a Continent, Birth of an Ocean

    To those who live there, east Africa’s Afar region is “the place the devil plows.” One of the hottest and lowest areas on Earth, it is a landscape of baking desert and barren lava flows. To scientists, though, Afar means something more promising: geology in the raw.

    There, on the edge of Africa, the continent is splitting apart. Pulled inexorably by the...

    06/17/2011 - 10:30 Earth & Environment