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  • Jeremy Freeman
  • webcam shot of an osprey nest
  • group of ISIS members
Your search has returned 700 articles:
  • Feature

    Jeremy Freeman seeks to simplify complex brain science

    Jeremy Freeman, 30NeuroscientistHoward Hughes Medical Institute, Janelia Research Campus

    Jeremy Freeman loves clean, simple lines. To see his bent toward aesthetic minimalism, you need look no further than his spare, calm website that slowly shifts colors.

    In the past, this fixation with style has occasionally veered toward the extreme. In graduate school at New York University, “...

    09/21/2016 - 11:05 Neuroscience, Cells, Computing
  • Scicurious

    Empathy for animals is all about us

    There’s an osprey nest just outside Jeffrey Brodeur’s office at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts. “I literally turn to my left and they’re right there,” says Brodeur, the organization’s communications and outreach specialist. WHOI started live-streaming the osprey nest in 2005.

    For the first few years, few people really noticed. All that changed in 2014. An...

    06/29/2016 - 07:00 Science & Society, Psychology, Neuroscience
  • Feature

    New studies explore why ordinary people turn terrorist

    Fierce combat erupted in February 2016 at the northern Iraqi village of Kudilah. A Western-backed coalition of Arab Sunni tribesmen, Kurds in the Iraqi army and Kurdish government forces advanced on Islamic State fighters who had taken over the dusty outpost.

    Islamic State combatants, led by young men wearing explosive vests, fought back. The well-trained warriors scurried through battle...

    06/23/2016 - 13:00 Psychology, Anthropology
  • Scicurious

    How a fat hormone might make us born to run

    Last weekend, I ran the Navy-Air Force half-marathon. After pounding pavement for an hour or so, my legs began to feel light. Slightly numb. I felt fantastic. I had to remind myself to run, not to stop and dance, and that singing along to my candy-pop workout music — even at mile 10 — is not socially acceptable. It’s the hope of this euphoria — this runner’s high — that keeps me running.

    ...
    09/25/2015 - 10:58 Neuroscience
  • Feature

    Rehab for psychopaths

    Nudity, mind-altering drugs and encounter groups bring out the worst in psychopaths behind bars. That’s not a pitch for a new reality television show — not yet, at least. It’s an evidence-based conclusion. An infamous experimental treatment program for violent criminals, conducted mainly from 1968 to 1978 in a Canadian maximum security psychiatric facility 90 miles north of Toronto, tried...

    06/17/2015 - 07:30 Mental Health
  • Culture Beaker

    Attempt to shame journalists with chocolate study is shameful

    “I Fooled Millions Into Thinking Chocolate Helps Weight Loss. Here's How.”

    That’s the headline on a May 27 article by science journalist John Bohannon that revealed the backstory of a sting operation he conducted earlier this year. Bohannon and a German television reporter teamed up to “demonstrate just how easy it is to turn bad science into the big headlines behind diet fads.” So they...

    05/28/2015 - 18:09 Science & Society, Health
  • Scicurious

    Scientists of a feather flock together

    Scientists and nonscientists don’t always agree. When it comes to genetically modified foods, 88 percent of scientists think they are safe to eat. Only 37 percent of nonscientists approve of them. Scientists overwhelmingly (89 percent) support the use of animals in research, but only 47 percent of the public is in favor. And while 87 percent of scientists agree that humans are behind climate...

    02/12/2015 - 08:00 Psychology, Science & Society
  • Feature

    Is redoing scientific research the best way to find truth?

    R. Allan Mufson remembers the alarming letters from physicians. They were testing a drug intended to help cancer patients by boosting levels of oxygen-carrying hemoglobin in their blood.

    In animal studies and early clinical trials, the drug known as Epo (for erythropoietin) appeared to counteract anemia caused by radiation and chemotherapy. It had the potential to spare patients from the...

    01/13/2015 - 13:23 Science & Society
  • Scicurious

    Main result of Facebook emotion study: less trust in Facebook

    Psychologists secretly toyed with Facebook users’ emotions in 2012, published their findings last month and got scorched by a social media firestorm they never saw coming.

    What goes around comes around.

    The researchers wanted to see if emotions spread through online social networks. Apparently, negative emotions spread really fast on the Internet. Congratulations, guys, you’re on...

    07/03/2014 - 16:40 Science & Society, Psychology
  • Gory Details

    Why death smells so deadly

    When I was in graduate school, I once gassed out my lab with the smell of death. I was studying the products of plant decomposition, and I had placed copious quantities of duckweed into large tubs and let the mix decompose for a few weeks. Duckweed is a small floating aquatic plant; it looks harmless enough. But when I dragged my tubs into the lab and set up a pump and filtration system, all...

    11/15/2013 - 15:47 Chemistry