Search Content | Science News

SUPPORT SCIENCE NEWS

Help us keep you informed.

Real Science. Real News.

Search Content

E.g., 12/15/2018
E.g., 12/15/2018
Your search has returned 489 images:
  • illustration of Voyager probe locations
  • John Carlin and his wife Martha
  • flu death in 1918
Your search has returned 17930 articles:
  • News

    Voyager 2 spacecraft enters interstellar space

    Voyager 2 has entered interstellar space. The spacecraft slipped out of the huge bubble of particles that encircles the solar system on November 5, becoming the second ever human-made craft to cross the heliosphere, or the boundary between the sun and the stars.

    Coming in second place is no mean achievement. Voyager 1 became the first spacecraft to exit the solar system in 2012. But that...

    12/10/2018 - 12:57 Cosmology, Particle Physics
  • Feature

    A gut-brain link for Parkinson’s gets a closer look

    Martha Carlin married the love of her life in 1995. She and John Carlin had dated briefly in college in Kentucky, then lost touch until a chance meeting years later at a Dallas pub. They wed soon after and had two children. John worked as an entrepreneur and stay-at-home dad. In his free time, he ran marathons.

    Almost eight years into their marriage, the pinky finger on John’s right hand...

    12/07/2018 - 09:00 Health, Neuroscience, Microbiology
  • Reviews & Previews

    Two new books explore the science and history of the 1918 flu pandemic

    The U.S.S. Leviathan set sail from Hoboken, N.J., on September 29, 1918, carrying roughly 10,000 troops and 2,000 crewmen. The ship, bound for the battlefields in France, had been at sea less than 24 hours when the first passengers fell ill. By the end of the day, 700 people had developed signs of the flu.

    The medical staff tried to separate the sick from the healthy, but that soon...

    12/07/2018 - 07:00 Health, History of Science, Microbiology
  • Feature

    Beavers are engineering a new Alaskan tundra

    In a broad swath of northwestern Alaska, small groups of recent immigrants are hard at work. Like many residents of this remote area, they’re living off the land. But these industrious foreigners are neither prospecting for gold nor trapping animals for their pelts. In fact, their own luxurious fur was once a hot commodity. Say hello to Castor canadensis, the American beaver.

    Much like...

    11/28/2018 - 09:00 Ecosystems, Ecology, Animals
  • Reviews & Previews

    Why a chemistry teacher started a science board game company

    A physicist, a gamer and two editors walk into a bar. No, this isn’t the setup for some joke. After work one night, a few Science News staffers tried out a new board game, Subatomic. This deck-building game combines chemistry and particle physics for an enjoyable — and educational — time.

    Subatomic is simple to grasp: Players use quark and photon cards to build protons, neutrons and...

    11/25/2018 - 09:00 Particle Physics, Chemistry, Science & Society
  • News

    Astronomers spot another star that flickers like Tabby’s star

    There’s another oddly flickering star in the galaxy.

    Astronomers using a telescope in Chile have discovered a star whose strange dimming and brightening of light are reminiscent of Tabby’s star, which was once suggested to host an alien megastructure.

    The megastructure idea, first posited in 2015, was later quashed by data suggesting that the dips are probably from dust particles...

    11/16/2018 - 10:14 Astronomy, Planetary Science
  • Feature

    How mammoths competed with other animals and lost

    The Gray Fossil Site, a sinkhole in northeastern Tennessee, is full of prehistoric treasures. Between 7 million and 4.5 million years ago, rhinoceroses, saber-toothed cats and other creatures, even red pandas, perished here by the edge of a pond. But that bounty of fossils pales next to the site’s biggest find: a mastodon’s skeleton, nearly 5 million years old, preserved in exquisite detail...

    11/13/2018 - 12:30 Ecosystems, Archaeology, Paleontology
  • News

    China is about to visit uncharted territory on the moon

    China is about to make space history. In December, the country will launch the first spacecraft ever to land on the farside of the moon. Another craft, slated for takeoff in 2019, will be the first to bring lunar rocks back to Earth since 1976.

    These two missions — the latest in China’s lunar exploration series named after the Chinese moon goddess, Chang’e — are at the forefront of...

    11/11/2018 - 07:00 Planetary Science
  • News

    Ancient DNA suggests people settled South America in at least 3 waves

    DNA from a 9,000-year-old baby tooth from Alaska, the oldest natural mummy in North America and remains of ancient Brazilians is helping researchers trace the steps of ancient people as they settled the Americas. Two new studies give a more detailed and complicated picture of the peopling of the Americas than ever before presented.

    People from North America moved into South America in at...

    11/09/2018 - 09:00 Genetics, Ancestry
  • News

    Hints of Oort clouds around other stars may lurk in the universe’s first light

    A thick sphere of icy debris known as the Oort cloud shrouds the solar system. Other star systems may harbor similar icy reservoirs, and those clouds may be visible in the universe’s oldest light, researchers report.

    Astronomer Eric Baxter of the University of Pennsylvania and colleagues looked for evidence of such exo-Oort clouds in maps of the cosmic microwave background, the cool...

    11/09/2018 - 06:00 Planetary Science, Exoplanets, Cosmology