Search Content | Science News

ADVERTISEMENT

MISSION CRITICAL

Support credible science journalism.

Subscribe to Science News today.

Search Content

E.g., 10/23/2017
E.g., 10/23/2017
Your search has returned 387 images:
  • Jennifer Dionne
  • KC Huang
Your search has returned 17825 articles:
  • Feature

    Christina Warinner uncovers ancient tales in dental plaque

    Christina Warinner, 37Molecular anthropologistUniversity of OklahomaMax Planck Institute for theScience of Human History

    In a pitch-black rainforest with fluttering moths and crawling centipedes, Christina Warinner dug up her first skeleton. Well, technically it was a full skeleton plus two headless ones, all seated and draped in ornate jewelry. To deter looters, she excavated through the night...

    10/04/2017 - 13:45 Anthropology, Genetics, Archaeology
  • Editor's Note

    Nature offers inspiration, and occasionally courage

    When Donald Griffin and Robert Galambos first reported that bats use the ricocheting echoes of sound waves to pilot through the environment, some scientists doubted it was possible. The team’s experiments, conducted in the late 1930s at Harvard University and reported in the early 1940s, coincided with World War II and the proliferation of active sonar systems for use on ships and submarines...

    09/20/2017 - 12:47 Technology, Animals
  • Feature

    Bat brain signals illuminate navigation in the dark

    Ninad Kothari’s workplace looks like something out of a sci-fi film. The graduate student at Johns Hopkins University works in a darkened, red-lit room, where he trains bats to fly through obstacle courses. Shielding within the walls keeps radio and other human-made signals from interfering with transmissions from the tiny electrical signals he’s recording from the bats’ brains as the animals...

    09/20/2017 - 12:30 Animals, Neuroscience
  • News

    A new test of water ripples supports the idea of quantum heat in a vacuum

    Empty space might feel hot to a traveler zipping through at a rapidly increasing clip — or so some physicists predict. And a new experiment provides a hint that they might be right.

    That idea, known as the Unruh effect, seems to be supported by an analogous effect that appears in a tank of rippling water. Patterns in the waves, when analyzed as if seen by an accelerating observer, appear...

    09/18/2017 - 07:00 Quantum Physics
  • News

    The sun’s strongest flare in 11 years might help explain a solar paradox

    A series of rapid-fire solar flares is providing the first chance to test a new theory of why the sun releases its biggest outbursts when its activity is ramping down. Migrating bands of magnetism that meet at the sun’s equator may cause the biggest flares, even as the sun is going to sleep.

    A single complex sunspot called Active Region 2673 emitted seven bright flares — powerful bursts...

    09/11/2017 - 16:30 Astronomy, Particle Physics
  • Feature

    Machines are getting schooled on fairness

    You’ve probably encountered at least one machine-learning algorithm today. These clever computer codes sort search engine results, weed spam e-mails from inboxes and optimize navigation routes in real time. People entrust these programs with increasingly complex — and sometimes life-changing — decisions, such as diagnosing diseases and predicting criminal activity.

    Machine-learning...

    09/06/2017 - 13:00 Technology, Science & Society
  • Feature

    Learning takes brain acrobatics

    Peer inside the brain of someone learning. You might be lucky enough to spy a synapse pop into existence. That physical bridge between two nerve cells seals new knowledge into the brain. As new information arrives, synapses form and strengthen, while others weaken, making way for new connections.

    You might see more subtle changes, too, like fluctuations in the levels of signaling...

    09/05/2017 - 11:00 Neuroscience
  • News

    Minuscule jitters may hint at quantum collapse mechanism

    A tiny, shimmying cantilever wiggles a bit more than expected in a new experiment. The excess jiggling of the miniature, diving board–like structure might hint at why the strange rules of quantum mechanics don’t apply in the familiar, “classical” world. But that potential hint is still a long shot: Other sources of vibration are yet to be fully ruled out, so more experiments are needed.

    ...

    09/01/2017 - 11:05 Quantum Physics
  • Reviews & Previews

    How science has fed stereotypes about women

    InferiorAngela SainiBeacon Press, $25.95

    Early in Inferior, science writer Angela Saini recalls a man cornering her after a signing for her book Geek Nation, on science in India. “Where are all the women scientists?” he asked, then answered his own question. “Women just aren’t as good at science as men are. They’ve been shown to be less intelligent.”

    Saini fought back with a few...

    08/29/2017 - 11:00 History of Science, Science & Society
  • News

    Bones reveal what it was like to grow up dodo

    Dumb extinction jokes aside, dodos’ life history is largely unknown.

    Now the first closeup look inside the long-gone birds’ bones is giving a glimpse into their lives, an international research team reports August 24 in Scientific Reports. Until now, almost nothing has been known about the basic biology of dodos, such as when they mated or how quickly they grew.

    Based on 22 bones...

    08/29/2017 - 07:00 Animals, Physiology, Evolution