Search Content | Science News

Be a Champion for Science

Get your subscription to

Science News when you join.

Search Content

E.g., 06/27/2017
E.g., 06/27/2017
Your search has returned 4 images:
  • cyborg flower beetle
  • cyborg beetle
  • General Fusion Reactor
Your search has returned 10 articles:
  • Science Ticker

    These cyborg beetles walk the walk

    View the video

    Resistance may soon be futile. With machine implants worthy of a Star Trek villain, a new breed of beetle takes walking instructions from its human overlords.

    Hirotaka Sato and his colleagues at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore inserted electrodes into flower beetles (Mecynorrhina torquata) to stimulate specific leg muscle groups. By altering the order...

    03/29/2016 - 19:05 Animals, Robotics, Biophysics
  • News in Brief

    Cyborg beetles walk the walk

    Resistance may soon be futile. With machine implants worthy of a Star Trek villain, a new breed of beetle takes walking instructions from its human overlords.

    Hirotaka Sato and his colleagues at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore inserted electrodes into flower beetles (Mecynorrhina torquata) to stimulate specific leg muscle groups. By altering the order of electrical zaps,...

    03/29/2016 - 19:05 Animals, Robotics, Biophysics
  • Feature

    Nuclear fusion gets boost from private-sector startups

    The lab where a company called General Fusion is trying to spark an energy revolution looks like a cross between a hardware store and a mad scientist’s lair. Bins full of electrical gadgets are piled high against the walls. Capacitors recycled from a bygone experiment are stacked up like bottles in wine racks. Ten-foot-high contraptions bristle with tangled wires and shiny plumbing.

    ...

    01/27/2016 - 12:30 Physics
  • Feature

    The ice of a distant moon

    View the video

    On an unusually hot summer day in Wales, Sanjay Vijendran and colleagues aimed a rocket sled at an elephant-sized ice cube.

    The sled rested on a raised metal track and carried what looked like a cartoon bundle of TNT to propel the contraption at the speed of sound. In front of it, a second sled held a bullet-shaped canister packed with scientific instruments.

    ...

    05/02/2014 - 14:00 Planetary Science, Technology
  • Letters to the Editor

    Feedback

    When birds collide

    In “Collision course” (SN: 9/21/13, p. 20), Susan Milius told the stories of two ornithologists working to develop windows that birds won’t fly into.

    With few exceptions, readers were sympathetic to the plight of birds that either don’t see windows or incorrectly interpret reflections. William Thompson e-mailed about his Colorado home: “At the height of bird activity,...

    09/24/2013 - 17:57 Animals, Psychology
  • Feature

    Sparing the rare earths

    The Toyota Prius isn’t exactly a muscle car. But the magnets under the hood certainly pack a punch.

    Pound for pound, these permanent magnets are some of the most powerful on the planet. They generate fields 10 times stronger than those of typical refrigerator magnets, helping the hybrid car’s motor and generator to turn the wheels and charge the...

    08/12/2011 - 10:13 Technology, Humans & Society, Matter & Energy, Earth & Environment, Chemistry
  • News

    Sperm whales may team up to herd prey

    PORTLAND — Sperm whales sometimes collaborate when they forage the depths, new tracking data suggest, with some individuals herding prey into dense schools while others lunge into the fray and feed.

    Scientists have long known that sperm whales, like many other toothed whales, form long-lasting social groups that typically consist of females and their young. While some...

    02/23/2010 - 12:54 Ecology, Life & Evolution
  • News

    Online Victims: Internet behaviors make targets of some kids

    About one in five youngsters reports encountering at least one instance of unwanted sexual solicitation or harassment online in the past year, a national telephone survey finds. Internet-safety programs that typically urge children to avoid posting personal information online ignore other behaviors that the new results suggest lead to such victimization.

    Sharing one's name, contact...

    02/07/2007 - 11:59 Other
  • Feature

    Digital Fingerprints

    Early during World War II, British intelligence officers eavesdropped on German radio transmissions, but because the messages were in an encrypted version of Morse code, the British couldn't understand the content. The dots and dashes came in distinctive rhythms, and the Allied spies quickly learned to recognize each Morse code operator's particular style, which the listeners called the...

    01/09/2007 - 11:17 Computing
  • Feature

    Lock-on-a-Chip May Close Hackers Out

    11/14/1998 - 00:00