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E.g., 01/17/2018
E.g., 01/17/2018
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  • bonobo
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Your search has returned 3395 articles:
  • News

    ‘Laid-back’ bonobos take a shine to belligerents

    Despite a reputation as mellow apes, bonobos have a thing for bad guys.

    Rather than latching on to individuals with a track record of helpfulness, adult bonobos favor obstructionists who keep others from getting what they want. The result may help explain what differentiates humans’ cooperative skills from those of other apes, biological anthropologists Christopher Krupenye of the...

    01/05/2018 - 15:18 Anthropology, Animals, Evolution
  • News

    The sun’s outer atmosphere is far more complex than previously thought

    NEW ORLEANS — Despite its smooth appearance, the sun’s wispy outer atmosphere is surprisingly full of knots, whorls and blobs.

    Newly analyzed observations from NASA’s STEREO spacecraft show that the sun’s outer corona is just as complicated as the highly structured inner corona, solar physicists reported December 12 at the fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union. That previously...

    12/19/2017 - 13:00 Astronomy
  • News in Brief

    Federal maps underestimate flood risk for tens of millions of people, scientists warn

    NEW ORLEANS — National flood maps are underestimating the risk for tens of millions of people in the United States. That’s the conclusion of researchers presenting a new study December 11 at the American Geophysical Union’s fall meeting.

    The U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency estimates that about 13 million people live in a “1-in-100-year” floodplain zone, a region that has a 1...

    12/13/2017 - 15:13 Earth, Climate
  • Editor's Note

    2017 delivered humility, and proved our potential

    The Top 10 science stories of 2017, selected by Science News staff and presented in this year-end issue, have the potential to make you feel small and certainly humble. Our No. 1 story of the year takes place an unfathomably distant 130 million light-years away, where a neutron star smashup produced, by some estimates, 10 Earth masses worth of gold — wow! That’s enough for many...
    12/13/2017 - 08:46 Science & Society, Astronomy, Genetics
  • Year in Review

    A quantum communications satellite proved its potential in 2017

    During the world’s first telephone call in 1876, Alexander Graham Bell summoned his assistant from the other room, stating simply, “Mr. Watson, come here. I want to see you.” In 2017, scientists testing another newfangled type of communication were a bit more eloquent. “It is such a privilege and thrill to witness this historical moment with you all,” said Chunli Bai, president of the...

    12/13/2017 - 08:28 Quantum Physics
  • News

    What hospitals can do to help keep excess opioids out of communities

    To halt the misuse of opioids, it may help to slash the number of pills prescribed, a new study suggests.

    Five months after the implementation of new opioid prescription guidelines at a University of Michigan hospital, roughly 7,000 fewer pills went home with patients — a drop that might reduce the risk of accessible pills leading to substance abuse. But the opioid reduction didn’t leave...

    12/06/2017 - 17:23 Health
  • News

    Collision illuminates the mysterious makeup of neutron stars

    On astrophysicists’ charts of star stuff, there’s a substance that still merits the label “here be dragons.” That poorly understood material is found inside neutron stars — the collapsed remnants of once-mighty stars — and is now being mapped out, as scientists better characterize the weird matter.

    The detection of two colliding neutron stars, announced in October (SN: 11/11/17, p. 6),...

    12/01/2017 - 07:00 Physics, Astronomy
  • Mystery Solved

    Here’s what really happened to Hanny’s Voorwerp

    The weird glowing blob of gas known as Hanny’s Voorwerp was a 10-year-old mystery. Now, Lia Sartori of ETH Zurich and colleagues have come to a two-pronged solution.

    Hanny van Arkel, then a teacher in the Netherlands, discovered the strange bluish-green voorwerp, Dutch for “object,” in 2008 as she was categorizing pictures of galaxies as part of the Galaxy Zoo citizen science project....

    11/27/2017 - 15:30 Astronomy
  • News

    ‘Arrow of time’ reversed in quantum experiment

    Your lukewarm cup of coffee won’t suddenly heat itself up, no matter how long you put off the trek to the microwave. But the same rule doesn’t necessarily apply to quantum systems. Like chilly air warming a mug, heat can spontaneously flow from a cold quantum particle to a hotter one under certain conditions, researchers report November 10 at arXiv.org. This phenomenon seems to reverse the “...

    11/27/2017 - 07:00 Quantum Physics
  • Science Visualized

    Watch NASA’s mesmerizing new visualization of the 2017 hurricane season

    View the video

    How do you observe the invisible currents of the atmosphere? By studying the swirling, billowing loads of sand, sea salt and smoke that winds carry. A new simulation created by scientists at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., reveals just how far around the globe such aerosol particles can fly on the wind.

    The complex new simulation, powered by...

    11/20/2017 - 07:00 Earth, Climate