Search Content | Science News

Love Science? Welcome Home.

Support Amazing Science Journalism.

Create the New Science Generation.

Search Content

E.g., 01/18/2017
E.g., 01/18/2017
Your search has returned 2682 images:
  • robot heart
  • soap bubble film
  • better batteries
Your search has returned 18856 articles:
  • News in Brief

    Heart-hugging robot does the twist (and squeeze)

    View the video

    A new squishy robot could keep hearts from skipping a beat.

    A silicone sleeve slipped over pigs’ hearts helped pump blood when the hearts failed, researchers report January 18 in Science Translational Medicine. If the sleeve works in humans, it could potentially keep weak hearts pumping, and buy time for patients waiting for a transplant.

    To make the device...

    01/18/2017 - 14:00 Technology, Robotics
  • Science Visualized

    Shimmering soap bubbles have a dark side

    View the video

    Zoom in on a soap bubble just before it bursts and brilliant, complex patterns emerge. Shimmery rainbows appear in thicker portions of the soap film, while clusters of dark spots appear in the thinnest regions.

    The thickness of the soap film determines the color seen. Light rays that reflect off of the top and bottom of the film combine to amplify particular...

    01/12/2017 - 07:00 Biophysics
  • Feature

    Better batteries charge forward

    Everybody wants more power from their batteries. Smartphones and laptops always need recharging. Electric car drivers must carefully plan their routes to avoid being stranded far from a charging station. Anyone who struggles with a tangle of chargers every night would prefer a battery that can last for weeks or months.

    For researchers who specialize in batteries, though, the drive for a...

    01/09/2017 - 17:50 Chemistry
  • Reviews & Previews

    ‘Time Travel’ tours a fascinating fiction

    Time TravelJames GleickPantheon, $26.95

    It’s kind of daring to write a science book about something that — you must remind your readers — doesn’t exist. That’s James Gleick’s task in Time Travel, an engaging and entertaining look at science that will always remain fiction.

    It’s lucidly written, a breeze to read and erudite in assessing a vast range of literary and popular media...

    01/08/2017 - 08:00 Physics, Science & Society
  • Reviews & Previews

    ‘Furry Logic’ showcases how animals exploit physics

    Furry LogicMatin Durrani and Liz KalaugherBloomsbury, $27

    Warning: Furry Logic is not, as the title might suggest, a detailed exploration of mammals’ reasoning skills. Instead, it’s a fun, informative chronicle of how myriad animals take advantage of the laws of physics.

    Science writers Matin Durrani and Liz Kalaugher cite a trove of recent (and often surprising) research findings...

    01/07/2017 - 08:00 Animals, Biophysics
  • It's Alive

    Meat-eating pitcher plants raise deathtraps to an art

    Tricking some bug into drowning takes finesse, especially for a hungry meat eater with no brain, eyes or moving parts. Yet California pitcher plants are very good at it.

    Growing where deposits of the mineral serpentine would kill most other plants, Darlingtonia californica survives in low-nutrient soil by being “very meat dependent,” says David Armitage of the University of Notre Dame in...

    01/06/2017 - 07:00 Plants, Ecology, Evolution
  • 50 Years Ago

    Saturn’s 10th moon was the first satellite discovered in the modern space age

    Tenth moon of Saturn

    The first natural satellite in the solar system to be discovered since artificial satellites were launched has been found circling Saturn. Dr. Audouin Dollfus of the Observatory of Physical Astronomy at Meudon, France, spotted Saturn’s tenth satellite on three photographs taken in mid-December when the planet’s rings were seen edge-on from earth. — Science News,...

    01/05/2017 - 10:00 Astronomy
  • What Were They Thinking?

    Ancient Egyptian pot burials were not just for the poor

    New research is stirring the pot about an ancient Egyptian burial practice.

    Many ancient peoples, including Egyptians, buried some of their dead in ceramic pots or urns. Researchers have long thought these pot burials, which often recycled containers used for domestic purposes, were a common, make-do burial for poor children.

    But at least in ancient Egypt, the practice was not...

    01/03/2017 - 07:00 Archaeology, Anthropology
  • Feature

    These 2016 stories could be really big — if they're true

    These findings would have rocked the scientific world, if only the evidence had been more convincing.

    New Planet 9 clues

    A giant planet lurking at the outskirts of the solar system could explain the odd orbits of far-flung hunks of icy debris (SN: 2/20/16, p. 6). If the planet exists, its average distance from the sun would be between 500 and 600 times Earth’s distance (SN: 7/23/16, p. 7...

    12/23/2016 - 10:00 Astronomy, Cells, Evolution
  • Film

    Hidden Figures highlights three black women who were vital to the U.S. space program

    View trailer

    Hollywood space flicks typically feature one type of hero: astronauts who defy the odds to soar into space and back again. But now a group of behind-the-scenes heroes from the early days of the U.S. space program are getting their due. Black female mathematicians performed essential calculations to safely send astronauts to and from Earth’s surface — in defiance of flagrant...

    12/23/2016 - 06:00 Numbers, History of Science, Computing