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  • Science Ticker

    There’s a new cervical cancer screening option

    For cervical cancer screening, there’s a new option in town.

    Women ages 30 to 65 can opt to have human papillomavirus, or HPV, testing alone every five years, according to new recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

    HPV testing alone joins two other alternatives that are still endorsed: an HPV test plus a Pap test every five years, or a Pap test alone every...

    08/21/2018 - 11:00 Health, Cancer
  • News

    A fossil mistaken for a bat may shake up lemurs’ evolutionary history

    In one published swoop, an ancient fossil fruit bat has turned into a lemur. If that transformation holds, it suggests that lemur ancestors made two tricky sea crossings from Africa to Madagascar, not one as researchers have often assumed.

    A new fossil analysis finds that the ancient species Propotto leakeyi, which lived in East Africa between 23 million and 16 million years ago, was not...

    08/21/2018 - 11:00 Anthropology, Animals
  • Science Ticker

    Americans support genetically engineering animals for people’s health

    Scientists have the power to genetically engineer many types of animals. Most Americans think it’s OK to alter or insert genes in animals and insects — provided it’s done in the interest of human health, according to a poll released August 16 from the Pew Research Center. The findings are similar to those from an earlier Pew survey, which found that a majority of Americans are fine with...

    08/20/2018 - 15:00 Genetics, Science & Society
  • Feature

    A freshwater, saltwater tug-of-war is eating away at the Everglades

    The boardwalk at Pa-hay-okee Overlook is a brief, winding path into a dreamworld in Everglades National Park. Beyond the wooden slats, an expanse of gently waving saw grass stretches to the horizon, where it meets an iron-gray sky. Hardwood tree islands — patches of higher, drier ground called hammocks — rise up from the prairie like surfacing swimmers. The rhythmic singing of cricket frogs is...

    08/20/2018 - 09:00 Ecosystems, Earth
  • News

    Ghostly antineutrinos could help ferret out nuclear tests

    Rogue nations that want to hide nuclear weapons tests may one day be thwarted by antineutrinos.

    Atomic blasts emit immense numbers of the lightweight subatomic particles, which can travel long distances through the Earth. In general, the particles — the antimatter twins of neutrinos — are notoriously difficult to spot. But a large antineutrino detector located within a few hundred...

    08/20/2018 - 07:00 Particle Physics, Technology
  • August 18, 2018

    08/18/2018 - 10:19
  • Mystery Solved

    How salamanders can regrow nearly complete tails but lizards can’t

    Salamanders and lizards can both regrow their tails, but not to equal perfection.

    While a regenerated salamander tail closely mimics the original, bone and all, a lizard’s replacement is filled with cartilage and lacks nerve cells. That contrast is due to differences between stem cells in the animals’ spinal cords, researchers report online August 13 in Proceedings of the National...

    08/17/2018 - 12:30 Cells, Development, Animals, Evolution
  • The –est

    Cheese found in an Egyptian tomb is at least 3,200 years old

    What may be the oldest known solid cheese has been found in an ancient Egyptian tomb.

    Made from a mixture of cow milk and either sheep or goat milk, the cheese filled a broken clay jar unearthed from a 13th century B.C. tomb for Ptahmes, the mayor of the ancient city of Memphis, researchers report online July 25 in Analytical Chemistry.

    Chemist Enrico Greco, who did the work while...

    08/17/2018 - 08:53 Science & Society, Archaeology, Chemistry
  • News

    A galaxy 11.3 billion light-years away appears filled with dark matter

    A distant galaxy appears filled with dark matter.

    The outermost stars in the Cosmic Seagull, a galaxy 11.3 billion light-years away, race too fast to be propelled by the gravity of the galaxy’s gas and stars alone. Instead, they move as if urged on by an invisible force, indicating the hidden presence of dark matter, astrophysicist Verónica Motta of the University of Valparaíso in Chile...

    08/17/2018 - 08:00 Astronomy
  • News

    Here’s what robots could learn from fire ants

    Robots, take note: When working in tight, crowded spaces, fire ants know how to avoid too many cooks in the kitchen.

    Observations of fire ants digging an underground nest reveal that a few industrious ants do most of the work while others dawdle. Computer simulations confirm that, while this strategy may not be the fairest, it is the most efficient because it helps reduce overcrowding in...

    08/16/2018 - 14:04 Robotics, Animals, Technology