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E.g., 12/13/2017
E.g., 12/13/2017
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  • Jupiter
  • tick on a dino feather preserved in amber
Your search has returned 109732 articles:
  • News in Brief

    New Horizons’ next target might have a moon

    NEW ORLEANS — The New Horizons team may get more than it bargained for with its next target. Currently known as 2014 MU69, the object might, in fact, be two rocks orbiting each other — and those rocks may themselves host a small moon.

    MU69 orbits the sun in the Kuiper Belt, a region more than 6.5 billion kilometers from Earth. That distance makes it difficult to get pictures of the...

    12/12/2017 - 18:49 Astronomy, Planetary Science
  • News

    Jupiter’s massive Great Red Spot is at least 350 kilometers deep

    NEW ORLEANS — Jupiter’s Great Red Spot has deep roots. Data from the first pass of NASA’s Juno spacecraft over the incessant storm show that its clouds stretch at least 350 kilometers down into the planet’s atmosphere. That means the storm is about as deep as the International Space Station is high above the Earth.

    Juno has been orbiting Jupiter since July 4, 2016, and it made its first...

    12/12/2017 - 16:31 Planetary Science, Astronomy
  • News

    Ticks had a taste for dinosaur blood

    Ticks once tickled dinosaurs’ feathers.

    The tiny arthropods have been surreptitiously sucking blood for more than 100 million years, but evidence of early ticks’ preferred hosts has been scant. Now, samples of amber from Myanmar have caught the critters with their spiny mouthparts inside the cookie jar. A hunk of 99-million-year-old amber holds a tick tangled in a dinosaur feather,...

    12/12/2017 - 11:00 Animals, Paleontology
  • News in Brief

    Mini brains may wrinkle and fold just like ours

    PHILADELPHIA — Flat brains growing on microscope slides may have revealed a new wrinkle in the story of how the brain folds.

    Cells inside the brains contract, while cells on the outside grow and push outward, researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, discovered from working with the lab-grown brains, or organoids. This push and pull results in folds in the...

    12/12/2017 - 07:00 Cells, Neuroscience
  • News

    Not all of a cell’s protein-making machines do the same job

    PHILADELPHIA — Protein-manufacturing factories within cells are picky about which widgets they construct, new research suggests. These ribosomes may not build all kinds of proteins, instead opting to craft only specialty products.

    Some of that specialization may influence the course of embryo development, developmental biologist and geneticist Maria Barna of Stanford University School of...

    12/12/2017 - 07:00 Cells, Genetics
  • News in Brief

    Watching this newborn island erode could tell us a lot about Mars

    NEW ORLEANS — Earth’s youngest bit of land is getting a new lease on life. When an erupting volcano birthed an island in the Pacific Ocean in late 2014, scientists thought waves would erode the island away within just a few months. Instead, new data suggest it could stick around for up to 30 years, researchers reported December 11 at a news conference at the American Geophysical Union’s fall...

    12/11/2017 - 17:48 Earth, Oceans, Planetary Science
  • News in Brief

    Saturn’s rings mess with the gas giant’s atmosphere

    NEW ORLEANS — Saturn’s mighty rings cast a long shadow on the gas giant — and not just in visible light.

    Final observations from the Cassini spacecraft show that the rings block the sunlight that charges particles in Saturn’s atmosphere. The rings may even be raining charged water particles onto the planet, researchers report online December 11 in Science and at the fall meeting of the...

    12/11/2017 - 17:38 Planetary Science
  • News in Brief

    Once settled, immigrants play important guard roles in mongoose packs

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    Immigrants, they get the job done — eventually. Among dwarf mongooses, it takes newcomers a bit to settle into a pack. But once these immigrants become established residents, everyone in the pack profits, researchers from the University of Bristol in England report online December 4 in Current Biology.  

    Dwarf mongooses (Helogale parvula) live in groups of around 10...

    12/11/2017 - 09:00 Animals, Ecology
  • Introducing

    This ancient marsupial lion had an early version of ‘bolt-cutter’ teeth

    A skull and other fossils from northeastern Australia belong to a new species in the extinct family of marsupial lions.

    This newly named species, Wakaleo schouteni, was a predator about the size of a border collie, says vertebrate paleontologist Anna Gillespie of the University of New South Wales in Sydney. At least 18 million years ago (and perhaps as early as 23 million years ago), it...

    12/11/2017 - 07:00 Animals, Paleontology, Evolution
  • News

    Most complete map of Titan reveals connected seas and cookie-cutter lakes

    Liquid methane and ethane flow through a subterranean plumbing system on Titan, which drains lakes and connects seas. That’s one of the first scientific results from the latest, most complete map of the Saturnian moon’s topography.

    Planetary scientist Paul Corlies of Cornell University and colleagues released the map — based on all the data from NASA’s Cassini mission, which ended in...

    12/08/2017 - 12:40 Astronomy, Planetary Science