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E.g., 04/26/2018
E.g., 04/26/2018
Your search has returned 6057 images:
  • giant ground sloths, Megatherium
  • all-sky map of the Milky Way
  • rice and wheat farmers
Your search has returned 110129 articles:
  • News in Brief

    Footprints prove humans hunted giant sloths during the Ice Age

    People tracking giant sloths thousands of years ago in what is now New Mexico left footprints that confirm humans once hunted the giant creatures, researchers report April 25 in Science Advances.

    Giant ground sloths, which vanished at the end of the last Ice Age around 10,000 years ago, could weigh more than an elephant. With their lethal claws and muscle, the herbivores would have been...

    04/25/2018 - 16:08 Archaeology, Animals
  • News in Brief

    The latest star map from the Gaia spacecraft plots 1.7 billion stars

    Using the precise position and brightness of almost 1.7 billion stars, the Gaia spacecraft has created the most precise 3-D map of the Milky Way yet.

    On April 25, the European Space Agency’s Gaia team released the spacecraft’s second batch of data, gathered from July 2014 to May 2016, used to create the map. The tally includes measurements of half a million quasars — the active black...

    04/25/2018 - 15:45 Astronomy
  • News

    In China, coffee shop habits show cultural differences tied to farming

    Deeply ingrained cultural differences in everyday behavior between natives of northern and southern China bubble up while sipping coffee in Starbucks and other cafés.

    How close people sit and whether they dodge or move chairs blocking aisles reveals whether their cultural roots go back to rice farming in southern China or wheat farming in northern China, researchers report April 25 in...

    04/25/2018 - 14:22 Psychology
  • News

    Asteroids could have delivered water to the early Earth

    Shooting small rocks from a high-speed cannon showed that some asteroids could have brought water to the early Earth — without all the water boiling away on impact, a new study finds.

    “We can’t bring an asteroid to Earth and crash it into the Earth, bad things would happen,” says planetary geologist R. Terik Daly, who did the research while a graduate student at Brown University in...

    04/25/2018 - 14:00 Planetary Science
  • News

    Spooky quantum entanglement goes big in new experiments

    Quantum entanglement has left the realm of the utterly minuscule, and crossed over to the just plain small. Two teams of researchers report that they have generated ethereal quantum linkages, or entanglement, between pairs of jiggling objects visible with a magnifying glass or even the naked eye — if you have keen vision.

    Physicist Mika Sillanpää and colleagues entangled the motion of...

    04/25/2018 - 13:00 Quantum Physics
  • News

    Clues to an Iron Age massacre lie in what the assailants left behind

    Club-wielding assailants struck the Scandinavian settlement with devastating violence, slaughtering at least 26 people and leaving the bodies where they fell. There, the bodies lay for 1,500 years until recovered recently by archaeologists analyzing clues about the Iron Age massacre.

    It’s unclear why the seaside ringfort of Sandby borg, on the Baltic Sea island of Ӧland, was targeted at...

    04/25/2018 - 07:00 Archaeology
  • News

    The first penis-scrotum transplant is the latest to go beyond lifesaving

    In a transplant first, a U.S. veteran severely injured by an explosive device in Afghanistan has received a penis and scrotum from a deceased donor.

    During the 14-hour surgery at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, doctors removed the patient’s damaged tissues and connected three arteries, four veins, two nerves and the urethra to the donated tissues. The patient is doing well and the...

    04/24/2018 - 18:13 Health
  • For Daily Use

    Private web browsing doesn’t mean no one is watching

    Take a quiz on web privacy

    Private web browsing isn’t nearly as private as many people think.

    Major web browsers, such as Google’s Chrome and Apple’s Safari, offer a private browsing option, sometimes known as “incognito.” The option allows people to surf the internet through a private window that doesn’t log activity into the browser’s history or influence future autofill...

    04/24/2018 - 15:30 Technology, Science & Society
  • News in Brief

    Genetically modified plant may boost supply of a powerful malaria drug

    Genetic modifications to a plant that makes artemisinin, a key compound used in malaria drugs, more than tripled the amount of the ingredient naturally produced in leaves.

    Previous attempts to genetically engineer Artemisia annua to increase the yield of artemisinin had failed. So Kexuan Tang, a plant scientist at Shanghai Jiao Tong University, and colleagues determined A. annua’s entire...

    04/24/2018 - 14:56 Plants, Genetics, Immune Science
  • Growth Curve

    Though often forgotten, the placenta has a huge role in baby’s health

    I am not the first person who has considered composing poetry to the placenta. One writer begins: “Oh Lady Placenta! What a life you lived in magenta.” Another almost coos to the “constant companion, womb pillow friend.” It might sound like odd inspiration for verse, but it’s entirely justified.

    This vital organ, which is fully formed by about 12 weeks, nurtures a growing fetus...

    04/24/2018 - 12:30 Pregnancy