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  • March 16, 2019

    03/14/2019 - 14:33
  • News

    The rise of farming altered our bite and changed how people talk

    Humankind’s gift of gab is not set in stone, and farming could help to explain why.

    Over the last 6,000 years or so, farming societies increasingly have substituted processed dairy and grain products for tougher-to-chew game meat and wild plants common in hunter-gatherer diets. Switching to those diets of softer, processed foods altered people’s jaw structure over time, rendering certain...

    03/14/2019 - 14:00 Language, Anthropology, Human Evolution
  • News

    Flickers and buzzes sweep mouse brains of Alzheimer’s plaques

    Fast clicking sounds can boost brainpower in mice with signs of Alzheimer’s disease. Like flickering lights, these external sounds spur a type of brain wave that seemed to sweep disease-related plaques from mice’s brains, researchers report in the March 14 Cell.It’s too early to say whether the same sorts of flickers and clicks could help people with Alzheimer’s. If so, the treatment would...

    03/14/2019 - 11:00 Health, Neuroscience
  • News

    Students worldwide are striking to demand action on climate change

    For the past several months, growing numbers of students around the world have been cutting class — not to play but to protest.

    The topic driving them is the same: Earth’s changing climate, as evidenced by increasing wildfires and droughts, rising seas and more extreme weather. As the students see it, governments have not done enough to cut the emissions of greenhouse gases, such as...

    03/14/2019 - 08:00 Climate, Science & Society
  • Feature

    What happens when the Bering Sea’s ice disappears?

    Peggy’s data were a bit of a shock.

    From an anchored vantage point in an expanse of the southeastern Bering Sea west of Alaska, Peggy, or mooring M2, had monitored conditions in the water for 25 years. A line of sensors extended down more than 70 meters to where Peggy was tethered to the seafloor, collecting information on temperature, salinity and other properties of the water.

    ...

    03/14/2019 - 06:45 Climate, Oceans, Ecosystems
  • News in Brief

    An origami design helps this robot lift delicate and heavy cargo

    A new robotic gripper is a strong “hand” with a soft touch.

    The bell-shaped gripper has a silicone rubber skeleton with an intricate origami design, wrapped in an airtight, latex rubber skin. When a vacuum sucks air out of the gripper, the skin constricts, forcing the origami skeleton to collapse into a narrow funnel. The bunched-up gripper’s ridged interior and rough latex skin help it...

    03/14/2019 - 00:05 Robotics, Technology
  • News

    Hidden compounds in many medications can trigger allergies

    For some patients, the so-called inactive ingredients in pills may be more active than previously thought.

    Every pill contains a pharmaceutical drug with some therapeutic effect on the body, as well as a mixture of inactive compounds added to boost the medication’s effectiveness or simply to make the pill more palatable. Inactive ingredients are generally considered harmless. But many...

    03/13/2019 - 14:00 Health
  • News in Brief

    Ultraprecise atomic clocks put Einstein’s special relativity to the test

    The ticktock of two ultraprecise clocks has proven Einstein right, once again.

    A pair of atomic clocks made of single ions of ytterbium kept pace with one another over six months, scientists report March 13 in Nature. The timepieces’ reliability supports a principle known as Lorentz symmetry. That principle was the foundation for Einstein’s special theory of relativity, which describes...

    03/13/2019 - 14:00 Physics
  • News

    Geneticists push for a 5-year global ban on gene-edited babies

    Eighteen researchers, including two CRISPR pioneers, are calling for a temporary ban on creating gene-edited babies.

    “We call for a global moratorium on all clinical uses of human germline editing — that is, changing heritable DNA (in sperm, eggs or embryos) to make genetically modified children,” the statement’s cosigners, who come from seven countries, wrote in the March 14 Nature....

    03/13/2019 - 14:00 Genetics, Science & Society
  • Science Stats

    Pharmaceutical abuse sent more than 350,000 people to the ER in 2016

    The misuse of prescription drugs and over-the-counter medications resulted in an estimated 358,000 trips to U.S. emergency departments in 2016 — and almost half of those cases involved young people ages 15 to 34, according to a new study based on a national public health surveillance system.  

    The analysis, reported online March 6 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, was based...

    03/13/2019 - 07:00 Health