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E.g., 09/24/2018
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  • News in Brief

    The first rovers to explore an asteroid just sent photos home

    The first rovers to explore the surface of an asteroid have landed. After touching down September 21, the vehicles took pictures of asteroid Ryugu and at least one hopped around.

    Japan’s Hayabusa2 spacecraft, which arrived at the near-Earth asteroid on June 27 after a journey of more than three years, released the MINERVA-II1 container from a height of about 60 meters (SN Online: 6/27/18...

    09/24/2018 - 18:30 Planetary Science
  • News

    A paralyzed man makes great strides with spinal stimulation and rehab

    With the help of a spine stimulator and intensive training, a formerly paralyzed man can command his legs to step again. This achievement, described online September 24 in Nature Medicine, inches researchers closer to restoring movement to paraplegic people.

    The therapy allows 29-year-old Jered Chinnock to control his leg movements with his thoughts. “This is highly significant,” study...

    09/24/2018 - 14:41 Neuroscience
  • News

    In lab tests, this gene drive wiped out a population of mosquitoes

    A new gene drive may push a species of malaria-carrying mosquito to extinction.

    In a small-scale laboratory study, the genetic engineering tool caused Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes to stop producing offspring in eight to 12 generations, researchers report September 24 in Nature Biotechnology. If the finding holds up in larger studies, the gene drive could be the first capable of wiping...

    09/24/2018 - 11:20 Genetics, Ecology
  • News in Brief

    Japan has launched a miniature space elevator

    A pair of tiny satellites that will help test technology for a space elevator is on its way to the International Space Station.

    At 1:52 p.m. EDT on September 22, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency launched a rocket carrying the STARS-Me experiment from the island of Tanegashima.

    STARS-Me (or Space Tethered Autonomous Robotic Satellite – Mini elevator), built by engineers at...

    09/24/2018 - 09:50 Astronomy
  • Science Visualized

    How math helps explain the delicate patterns of dragonfly wings

    The dainty veins gracing the wings of dragonflies and other insects are like fingerprints: Each wing displays a distinct pattern. A randomized mathematical process may help explain how certain thin filaments, called secondary veins, form these complex patterns, a new study finds.

    Insect wings consist of two types of veins, both of which provide structural support (SN: 6/24/17, p. 5)....

    09/23/2018 - 08:00 Animals, Biophysics
  • Teaser

    These new superthin antennas are made from metallic nanomaterials

    A new design for lightweight, flexible antennas, made from metallic 2-D materials, could one day be used connect household appliances and wearable devices to the internet (SN: 6/9/18, p. 18).

    Researchers created the antennas, described online September 21 in Science Advances, using a water-based ink containing 1-nanometer-thick flakes of titanium carbide. The ink can be sprayed, painted...

    09/21/2018 - 14:00 Technology
  • News

    The way hunter-gatherers share food shows how cooperation evolved

    East African Hadza hunter-gatherers are neither generous nor stingy. But the groups they live in are. That pattern highlights a flexible and underappreciated form of cooperation that may have helped humans go from mobile bands to industrialized states, researchers say.

    Some camps share food more than others, but Hadza circulate among all camps rather than clustering in the most...

    09/21/2018 - 13:31 Anthropology, Evolution
  • 50 years ago, a flu pandemic spurred vaccine research

    Girding against a new strain

    Flu comes in many kinds, and the current vaccine … has little effect against a newcomer that has afflicted at least 400,000 persons in Hong Kong. The Asian city was the source of the 1957 epidemic in the United States. Fears that it may provide a springboard for another one have caused the Public Health Service to ask eight pharmaceutical companies to...

    09/21/2018 - 09:00 Health, Immune Science, History of Science
  • News in Brief

    Kidney stones grow and dissolve much like geological crystals

    It took a close look at crystal formation in Yellowstone’s hot springs to understand stones much closer to home. Growth and dissolution patterns found in rocks there mirror what’s going on with stones in our kidneys, says Bruce Fouke, a geobiologist at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, contradicting the medical dogma that kidney stones don’t dissolve.

    Fouke, who usually...

    09/21/2018 - 07:00 Health, Physiology
  • News

    Drug overdose deaths in America are rising exponentially

    Even as the country’s attention is focused on the ongoing opioid epidemic, a new study shows that the United States has had a wide-ranging drug overdose problem for decades, and it’s growing ever worse.

    Analyzing nearly 600,000 accidental drug poisoning deaths from 1979 to 2016 shows that the country has seen an exponential rise in these cases, with the number of deaths doubling...

    09/20/2018 - 18:01 Health, Science & Society