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E.g., 10/11/2015
E.g., 10/11/2015
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  • Science Ticker

    Ancient Mars had long-lasting lakes of liquid water

    Large lakes once wet the Martian landscape for thousands of years at a time, new evidence suggests.

    Last year, NASA scientists reported that Gale Crater, currently home to the Curiosity rover, was once filled with liquid water. Analyzing sediments and signs of erosion, Curiosity mission...

    10/08/2015 - 14:00 Planetary Science
  • Feature

    Special Report: Gravity’s Century

    In 1915, the universe was small and static. Space was smooth. Gravity pulled things to the ground. At least that’s the way it was in the minds of all but one exceptional physicist — Albert Einstein.

    After years of pondering the interplay of space, time, matter and gravity, Einstein produced, in a single month, an utter transformation of science’s conception of the cosmos: the general...

    10/07/2015 - 11:27 Science & Society, Cosmology, Astronomy, Physics
  • Context

    Top 10 subatomic surprises

    Neutrinos are popular among the people who award the Nobel prizes.

    In 1995 Fred Reines won the physics Nobel for detecting neutrinos, bizarre subatomic particles that some experts said could never be detected. In 2002, Ray Davis and...

    10/06/2015 - 16:52 Particle Physics, History of Science
  • News

    Neutrinos’ identity shift snares physics Nobel

    Capturing the identity-shifting behavior of neutrinos has won Takaaki Kajita of the University of Tokyo and Arthur McDonald of Queen’s University in Kingston, Canada, the 2015 Nobel Prize in physics. The scientists spearheaded giant underground experiments that revealed that the elusive particles morph from one variety into another. Those crucial...

    10/06/2015 - 16:35 Particle Physics, Cosmology
  • Feature

    Using general relativity to magnify the cosmos

    One of the most powerful known magnifying lenses isn’t found on Earth. The lens is built from stars, gas and dark matter and lies about 4 billion light-years away. As astronomers peer through it, they are finding the seeds of galaxies that were scattered around the universe more than 13 billion years ago.

    The lens is known as Abell 2744, a cosmic pileup where four groups of galaxies are...

    10/06/2015 - 12:38 Astronomy, Cosmology, Physics
  • Science Ticker

    Discovery of neutrino mass earns 2015 physics Nobel

    The discovery that subatomic particles called neutrinos have mass has won Takaaki Kajita of the University of Tokyo and Arthur McDonald of Queen’s University in Kingston, Canada, the 2015 Nobel Prize in physics. The scientists led two sophisticated experiments that found that the elusive particles can morph from one variety into another — a phenomenon that can occur only if neutrinos have mass...

    10/06/2015 - 06:41 Particle Physics, Cosmology
  • Reviews & Previews

    Centennial books illuminate Einstein’s greatest triumph

    You don’t need an anniversary as an excuse to write a book about Albert Einstein. But the centennial of his general theory of relativity has nonetheless provided an occasion for several new entries in the Einstein library. And even though general relativity — Einstein’s theory of gravity — has been thoroughly explored many times, some 2015 publications do offer new twists and insights.


    10/04/2015 - 07:00 History of Science, Science & Society, Physics, Cosmology
  • Feature

    Einstein's genius changed science's perception of gravity

    Albert Einstein opened humankind’s eyes to the universe.

    Before Einstein, space seemed featureless and changeless, as Isaac Newton had defined it two centuries earlier. And time, Newton declared, flowed at its own pace, oblivious to the clocks that measured it. But Einstein looked at space and time and saw a single dynamic stage — spacetime — on which matter and energy strutted,...

    10/04/2015 - 05:30 Astronomy, Physics, History of Science
  • News

    First stars may lurk in our galactic neighborhood

    They’re hiding among us. Some of the first stars to appear in the universe might still be lurking in the Milky Way, masked by nearly 13 billion years of cosmic pollution.

    Computer simulations indicate that relatively lightweight first-generation stars might be scattered throughout the galaxy. Observations have yet to turn up any but that’s because exposure to interstellar dust and gas...

    10/02/2015 - 06:00 Astronomy
  • The Name Game

    Ceres mountains and craters named for food

    Tubers, maize and even eggplants are finally getting the astronomical recognition they deserve. Or at least that’s true for the deities that look after the crops and celebrations of their harvest. Fifteen craters and mountains on the dwarf planet Ceres were officially named on September 21 after various spirits and celebrations...

    10/01/2015 - 12:00 Planetary Science