Search Content | Science News

ADVERTISEMENT

MISSION CRITICAL

Support credible science journalism.

Subscribe to Science News today.

Search Content

E.g., 04/22/2018
E.g., 04/22/2018
Your search has returned 1081 images:
  • Charon
  • TESS launch on Falcon 9 rocket
  • illustration of early solar system collisions
Your search has returned 2790 articles:
  • The Name Game

    Celebrity names now mark places on Pluto’s moon Charon

    Pluto’s largest moon, long seen as mysterious smudge at the outer reaches of our solar system, was revealed in 2015 closeup images to be pocked with craters, mountains and steep-sided depressions called chasmas. Now, 12 of those topographical features have names.

    Charon’s six most prominent craters were named for fictional explorers, including Dorothy who visited the fantastical land of...

    04/20/2018 - 07:00 Astronomy
  • Science Ticker

    NASA’s TESS spacecraft launches to begin its exoplanet search

    After a two-day delay, the planet-hunting TESS telescope successfully launched into a clear blue sky at Cape Canaveral, Fla., at 6:51 p.m. EDT on April 18.

    TESS, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, is headed to an orbit between the Earth and the moon, a journey that will take about two months. In its first two years, the telescope will seek planets orbiting 200,000 nearby, bright...

    04/18/2018 - 19:36 Exoplanets
  • News

    This meteorite’s diamonds hint that it was born in a lost planet

    A chunk of space rock may have been forged inside a long-lost planet from the early solar system. Tiny pockets of iron and sulfur embedded in diamonds inside the meteorite probably formed under high pressures found only inside planets the size of Mercury or Mars, researchers suggest April 17 in Nature Communications.

    The parent planet no longer exists, though — it was smashed to...

    04/18/2018 - 14:30 Planetary Science
  • Science Ticker

    Delayed launch of NASA’s next exoplanet hunter is now set for tonight

    Editor's note: This story has been updated April 18 with new launch plans for TESS.

    The launch of NASA’s next exoplanet hunter, TESS, has been rescheduled for 6:51 p.m. EDT April 18. You can watch launch coverage on NASA TV starting at 6:30 p.m. 

    SpaceX, whose Falcon 9 rocket is set to carry TESS into space, had scrubbed the satellite’s planned April 16 just hours before liftoff,...

    04/16/2018 - 14:53 Astronomy
  • News

    Lasers squeezed iron to mimic the conditions of exoplanet cores

    Physicists have simulated the cores of some large rocky exoplanets by pummeling iron with lasers. The resulting measurements give the first clue to how iron might behave inside planets outside the solar system that are several times the mass of Earth, researchers report April 16 in Nature Astronomy.

    “Until now, there’s been no data available on the state of these materials at the center...

    04/16/2018 - 12:49 Astrobiology, Planetary Science
  • News

    With the launch of TESS, NASA will boost its search for exoplanets

    NASA is stepping up its search for planets outside our solar system. Its next exoplanet hunting telescope, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), is due to launch from Cape Canaveral on the evening of April 16.

    Following the Kepler space telescope’s discovery of more than 5,000 possible exoplanets since 2009, TESS will continue the galactic census — flagging more planetary...

    04/12/2018 - 07:00 Astronomy, Exoplanets
  • News in Brief

    Einstein’s general relativity reveals new quirk of Mercury’s orbit

    The calculation of Mercury’s orbit is being tweaked — for a second time. And it’s all thanks to Albert Einstein.

    Before the famous physicist came up with his theory of gravity, known as the general theory of relativity, scientists’ predictions for Mercury’s motions were slightly off: The planet’s orbit disagreed with expectations. When Einstein realized that general relativity accounted...

    04/11/2018 - 12:11 Physics, Astronomy
  • News

    The search for mysterious dark matter underdogs steps up

    Scientists playing peekaboo with dark matter have entered a new stage of the game.

    For the first time, physicists are snooping on some of the likeliest hiding places for hypothetical subatomic particles called axions, which could make up dark matter. So far, no traces of the particles have been found, scientists with the Axion Dark Matter Experiment, ADMX, report April 9 in Physical...

    04/09/2018 - 11:00 Particle Physics, Cosmology
  • News in Brief

    Dark matter isn’t interacting with itself after all

    Dark matter is still the shyest particle in physics. New observations show that dark matter in galaxy cluster Abell 3827 stubbornly ignores all other kinds of matter — including itself, astronomers reported April 6 at the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science in Liverpool, England.

    The research, also posted online at arXiv.org, negates an earlier finding that stars were separated...

    04/05/2018 - 19:05 Astronomy, Cosmology
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers debate dinosaur designation and more

    Diagnosis dinosaur

    Some scientists are shaking up the dinosaur family tree and raising questions about which features define the ancient reptiles, Carolyn Gramling reported in “New fossils are redefining what makes a dinosaur” (SN: 3/3/18, p. 18).

    “I am a bit put out by the continuing references to dinosaurs as being reptiles,” reader David Persuitte wrote. Dinosaurs’ legs were...

    04/05/2018 - 07:52 Paleontology, Evolution, Planetary Science