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E.g., 03/27/2017
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  • Pluto
  • Pluto's hazy horizon
  • LHCb experiment
Your search has returned 2545 articles:
  • Soapbox

    It’s time to redefine what qualifies as a planet, scientists propose

    Pluto is a planet. It always has been, and it always will be, says Will Grundy of Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona. Now he just has to convince the world of that.

    For centuries, the word planet meant “wanderer” and included the sun, the moon, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn. Eventually the moon and sun were dropped from the definition, but Pluto was included, after its...

    03/23/2017 - 09:00 Planetary Science
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers question supernova physics

    Supernova surprise

    Astronomers continue to learn a lot from supernova 1987A, which burst onto the scene 30 years ago. Thanks to new detectors that can pick up neutrino signals and even gravitational waves, scientists will be ready when the next nearby star explodes, Emily Conover reported in “Waiting for a supernova” (SN: 2/18/17, p. 24).

    Steve Capps wondered how neutrinos inside an...

    03/22/2017 - 12:10 Particle Physics, Robotics, Condensed Matter
  • News

    How Pluto’s haze could explain its red spots

    Pluto may get its smattering of red spots from the fallout of its hazy blue skies, researchers say.

    Haze particles from the dwarf planet’s atmosphere settle onto all of Pluto’s surfaces. But some regions may become redder and darker than others because parts of the atmosphere collapse, exposing those spots to more surface-darkening radiation from space, researchers report March 22 at the...

    03/22/2017 - 09:41 Planetary Science
  • Science Ticker

    Large Hadron Collider experiment nabs five new particles

    Physicists have snagged a bounty of five new particles in one go.

    Members of the LHCb experiment, located at the Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, reported the prolific particle procurement in a paper posted online March 14 at arXiv.org. The five particles are each composed of three quarks — a class of particle that makes up larger particles such as protons and neutrons. Each of the new...

    03/21/2017 - 15:25 Particle Physics
  • News in Brief

    Close pass by sun didn’t radically alter comet 67P’s landscape

    At least one of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko’s dusty outbursts was the result of a landslide. But such changes to the surface of the comet haven’t radically altered its appearance, suggesting it has had roughly the same look for decades — or longer.

    Images from the Rosetta spacecraft taken before its demise show what happened to the comet as it passed close to the sun in 2015. Cliffs...

    03/21/2017 - 10:30 Astronomy, Planetary Science
  • News

    Distant galaxies lack dark matter, study suggests

    Very distant galaxies have surprisingly little dark matter, the invisible stuff thought to make up the bulk of matter in the universe, new observations suggest.

    Stars in the outer regions of some far-off galaxies move more slowly than stars closer to the center, indicating a lack of dark matter, astronomer Reinhard Genzel and colleagues report online March 15 in Nature. If confirmed, the...

    03/15/2017 - 14:00 Astronomy, Cosmology
  • Science Ticker

    In new Cassini portraits, Saturn’s moon Pan looks like pasta

    Saturn serves up the closest thing to space pasta, the latest round of images from NASA’s Cassini probe, released March 9, show.

    On March 7, the spacecraft snapped a series of portraits of Pan, Saturn’s small moon that orbits within a 325-kilometer gap in one of the planet’s rings. Taken at a distance of 24,572 kilometers from the moon, these are the closest images of Pan to date.

    ...

    03/10/2017 - 17:30 Astronomy
  • News

    Astronomers detect oldest known stardust in distant galaxy

    Astronomers may have spotted some of the earliest stardust ever created in the cosmos.

    Astrophysicist Nicolas Laporte of University College London and colleagues detected the dust in a galaxy seen as it was when the universe was only 600 million years old. “We are probably seeing the first stardust of the universe,” Laporte says. The observations, published online March 8 in the...

    03/08/2017 - 06:00 Astronomy, Cosmology
  • News

    Magnetism helps black holes blow off gas

    Black holes are a bit like babies when they eat: Some food goes in, and some gets flung back out into space. Astronomers now say they understand how these meals become so messy — and it’s a trait all black holes share, no matter their size.

    Magnetic fields drive the turbulent winds that blow gas away from black holes, says Keigo Fukumura, an astrophysicist at James Madison University in...

    03/06/2017 - 11:00 Astronomy
  • Science Ticker

    Rare triplet of high-energy neutrinos detected from an unknown source

    Three high-energy neutrinos have been spotted traveling in tandem.

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory in Antarctica detected the trio of lilliputian particles on February 17, 2016. This is the first time the experiment has seen a triplet of neutrinos that all seemed to come from the same place in the sky and within 100 seconds of one another. Researchers report the find February 20 on...

    03/03/2017 - 13:20 Particle Physics, Astronomy