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  • quarks and gluons
  • farside of the moon
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Your search has returned 3023 articles:
  • News

    An experiment hints at quantum entanglement inside protons

    Protons are complicated. The subatomic particles are themselves composed of smaller particles called quarks and gluons. Now, data from the Large Hadron Collider hint that protons’ constituents don’t behave independently. Instead, they are tethered by quantum links known as entanglement, three physicists report in a paper published April 26 at arXiv.org.

    Quantum entanglement has...

    05/17/2019 - 11:18 Quantum Physics, Particle Physics
  • News

    China’s lunar rover may have found minerals from the moon’s mantle

    The first mission to the farside of the moon may have found bits of the moon’s interior on its surface.

    The Yutu-2 rover, deployed by the Chinese Chang’e-4 spacecraft that landed on the moon in January, detected soil that appears rich in minerals thought to make up the lunar mantle, researchers report in the May 16 Nature. Those origins, if confirmed, could offer insight into the moon’s...

    05/15/2019 - 13:00 Planetary Science
  • News

    Apollo-era moonquakes reveal that the moon may be tectonically active

    The moon may still be kicking.

    Rumbles recorded decades ago by seismometers at Apollo landing sites are probably linked to young faults mapped by NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, scientists say. Eight of those moonquakes occurred within 30 kilometers of fault scarps, steplike cliffs on the lunar crust that mark places where one side of a fault has thrust up or slipped down. If true,...

    05/13/2019 - 11:00 Planetary Science
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers were curious about green icebergs, aliens and more

    Going green

    Researchers found iron oxides trapped in a sample of green Antarctic ice. The compounds may explain why typically blue-hued icebergs can sometimes appear green, Jeremy Rehm reported in “Tiny bits of iron may explain why some icebergs are green” (SN: 3/30/19, p. 12).

    “Since icebergs can drift for thousands of miles, and because iron is a limiting nutrient for algae, I...

    05/11/2019 - 07:00 Ecology, Astronomy, Health
  • News

    Dying stars called collapsars may forge much of the universe’s gold

    The gold in your favorite jewelry could be the messy leftovers from a newborn black hole’s first meal.

    Heavy elements such as gold, platinum and uranium might be formed in collapsars — rapidly spinning, massive stars that collapse into black holes as their outer layers explode in a rare type of supernova. A disk of material, swirling around the new black hole as it feeds, can create the...

    05/08/2019 - 13:02 Astronomy, Physics
  • News

    What a nearby kilonova would look like

    If two dense neutron stars collided relatively close to Earth, the resulting kilonova would shine day and night with the brightness of the moon squeezed into a small dot.

    “At night, it would be by far the brightest thing up there,” says physicist Imre Bartos of the University of Florida in Gainesville, who describes what the bright burst would look like in a study posted May 7 at arXiv....

    05/08/2019 - 09:16 Physics, Astronomy
  • News

    LIGO is on the lookout for these 8 sources of gravitational waves

    Seekers of gravitational waves are on a cosmic scavenger hunt.

    Since the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory turned on in 2015, physicists have caught these ripples in spacetime from several exotic gravitational beasts — and scientists want more.

    This week, LIGO and its partner observatory Virgo announced five new possible gravitational wave detections in a...

    05/06/2019 - 13:14 Physics, Astronomy
  • News in Brief

    LIGO and Virgo made 5 likely gravitational wave detections in a month

    Gravitational wave sightings are now a weekly occurrence.

    It took decades of work to find the first set of ripples in spacetime, detected in 2015 (SN: 3/5/16, p. 6). But now, just a month after reviving the search with newly revamped detectors, scientists with the LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave observatories have already made five potential sightings of the tiny, elusive tremors.

    ...
    05/02/2019 - 13:41 Physics, Astronomy
  • News

    Water has been found in the dust of an asteroid thought to be bone-dry

    For the first time, evidence of water has been found in a stony type of asteroid once thought to be bone-dry.

    Grains of dust from the asteroid Itokawa actually contain a surprising amount of water, two cosmochemists from Arizona State University in Tempe report May 1 in Science Advances.

    “We didn’t really expect water to be there in Itokawa at all,” says study coauthor Maitrayee...

    05/01/2019 - 14:00 Planetary Science
  • News

    Skepticism grows over whether the first known exomoon exists

    Hopes that astronomers found a moon orbiting a planet outside our solar system may be slowly dimming.

    Two different groups of researchers took another look at data to search for a telltale dip in starlight that could suggest a moon was passing in front of the star Kepler 1625. Their conflicting results raise questions about whether the exomoon exists.

    “When I reanalyzed the data, I...

    04/30/2019 - 12:30 Astronomy, Planetary Science