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E.g., 06/19/2018
E.g., 06/19/2018
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  • Pillars of Creation
  • Joseph Weber
  • artist's illustration of an infant planet
Your search has returned 1425 articles:
  • News

    Magnetic fields may be propping up the Pillars of Creation

    The Pillars of Creation may keep standing tall due to the magnetic field within the star-forming region.

    For the first time, scientists have made a detailed map of the magnetic field inside the pillars, made famous by an iconic 1995 Hubble Space Telescope image (SN Online: 1/6/15). The data reveal that the field runs along the length of each pillar, perpendicular to the magnetic field...

    06/15/2018 - 13:21 Astronomy
  • In 1968, scientists thought they were close to detecting gravity waves

    Gravity waves evidence

    The long search for gravitational waves … may be in the final lap…. Rotating binary stars or, perhaps, other galaxies like the Milky Way but far beyond it, or the center of the Milky Way itself, are likely sources for gravitational radiation. — Science News, June 22, 1968.

    Update

    Although Joseph Weber, a physicist at the University of Maryland, announced...

    06/15/2018 - 12:00 Astronomy, Physics
  • News in Brief

    Swirling gases reveal baby planets in a young star’s disk

    Baby planets growing in a disk of gas and dust around an infant star have been identified and weighed for the first time. In papers published June 13 in the Astrophysical Journal Letters, two teams of astronomers describe a new technique to observe the newborn planets with unprecedented precision.

    One team, led by Richard Teague of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, found two...

    06/14/2018 - 11:00 Exoplanets, Astronomy
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers were curious about pendulum saws, laser tweezers and more

    Cutting remark

    Archaeologist Nicholas Blackwell built a version of a Bronze Age pendulum saw that may have been used to build Mycenaean palaces, Bruce Bower reported in “How a backyard pendulum saw sliced into a Bronze Age mystery” (SN: 4/28/18 & 5/12/18, p. 32).

    Reader Fredric Blum argued that a pendulum saw’s blade would have dulled too fast to completely cut through stone...

    06/12/2018 - 07:00 Astronomy, Archaeology, Technology
  • News

    The sun shrinks a teensy bit when it’s feeling active

    How big is the sun? Well, that depends on when you’re measuring.

    The sun slightly shrinks and expands as it goes through a solar cycle, a roughly 11-year period of high and low magnetic activity, a new study finds. When the sun is the most active, its radius decreases by 1 or 2 kilometers, two researchers report in a paper accepted in the Astrophysical Journal. Given that the sun’s full...

    06/11/2018 - 07:00 Astronomy, Physics
  • News

    If real, dark fusion could help demystify this physics puzzle

    Fusion may have a dark side. A shadowy hypothetical process called “dark fusion” could be occurring throughout the cosmos, a new study suggests.

    The standard type of fusion occurs when two atomic nuclei unite to form a new element, releasing energy in the process. “This is why the sun shines,” says physicist Sam McDermott of Fermilab in Batavia, Ill. A similar process — dark fusion —...

    06/06/2018 - 09:00 Particle Physics, Astronomy
  • Science Ticker

    Take a virtual trip to an alien world

    If you’re looking for starry skies, exotic plant life and extreme weather on your summer vacation, NASA’s Exoplanet Travel Bureau has just the spot. Consider a trip to Kepler 186f.

    This extrasolar planet is nearly 558 light-years away, so a real trip may be out of your budget — and astronomers aren’t sure if the sphere even has a life-sustaining atmosphere. But NASA’s Exoplanet...

    06/04/2018 - 10:00 Exoplanets, Astronomy
  • News in Brief

    A neutron star crash may have spawned a black hole

    The first observed smashup of two stellar remnants known as neutron stars probably forged the least massive black hole yet discovered, researchers report in the June 1 Astrophysical Journal Letters.

    This cosmic collision, observed in August 2017, took the astronomical community by storm and offered insights into the origins of precious metals and the mysterious dark energy that fuels the...

    06/01/2018 - 13:52 Astronomy, Physics
  • News in Brief

    Two-faced star reveals a pulsar’s surprising bulk

    A two-faced star just helped weigh an extra-massive pulsar.

    The star takes about four hours to orbit its companion, a fast-spinning stellar corpse called a pulsar that’s about 10,000 light-years from Earth. That means the pair’s orbital dance is tight enough that the star always shows the same face to the pulsar, similar to how the moon is oriented to Earth.

    Radiation from the...

    05/31/2018 - 09:00 Astronomy, Particle Physics
  • News

    Astronomers scrutinized last year’s eclipse. Here’s what they’ve learned

    LEESBURG, Va. — Astronomers watching the 2017 solar eclipse from the ground and from the air witnessed new, tantalizing features of the sun’s outer atmosphere.

    Three teams have recently presented their first science results from the Great American Eclipse. Combined, the findings could help disentangle lingering solar puzzles, such as how bursts of plasma leave the sun, why the outer...

    05/29/2018 - 11:53 Astronomy, Planetary Science