Search Content | Science News

SCIENCE NEWS NEEDS YOU

Support nonprofit journalism

Subscribe now

Search Content

E.g., 03/25/2019
E.g., 03/25/2019
Your search has returned 709 images:
  • atomic clock
  • electronic chip
  • microscopic water droplets showing iridescent rings of colored light
Your search has returned 2525 articles:
  • News in Brief

    Ultraprecise atomic clocks put Einstein’s special relativity to the test

    The ticktock of two ultraprecise clocks has proven Einstein right, once again.

    A pair of atomic clocks made of single ions of ytterbium kept pace with one another over six months, scientists report March 13 in Nature. The timepieces’ reliability supports a principle known as Lorentz symmetry. That principle was the foundation for Einstein’s special theory of relativity, which describes...

    03/13/2019 - 14:00 Physics
  • News in Brief

    Scientists have chilled tiny electronics to a record low temperature

    BOSTON — ­Today’s nanoelectronics weather forecast: positively frigid.

    Tiny electronic chips have been cooled to a record low temperature, dipping below a thousandth of a kelvin for the first time ever, scientists reported March 6 at a meeting of the American Physical Society.

    To reach the frosty temperature, the scientists incorporated tiny bits of metal on the chip, which act...

    03/08/2019 - 15:37 Physics
  • Science Visualized

    How droplets of oil or water can glow vibrant colors

    Oil and water may not mix, but the two have now revealed a new example of structural color, in which an object’s hue arises from its shape.

    Studying droplets made of two layers of clear oil, researchers discovered that, depending on a viewer’s perspective, the tiny blobs glowed a variety of vibrant colors under white light. In a petri dish, same-sized droplets changed color as the dish...

    03/08/2019 - 14:00 Physics, Materials
  • Mystery Solved

    Microwaved grapes make fireballs, and scientists now know why

    Here’s a recipe for homemade plasma: Cut a grape in half, leaving the two sections connected at one end by the grape’s thin skin. Heat the fruit in a microwave for a few seconds. Then, boom: From the grape erupts a small plasma fireball — a hot mixture of electrons and electrically charged atoms, or ions.

    This trick has been floating around the internet for decades, and previous...

    03/08/2019 - 09:00 Physics
  • News in Brief

    Japan puts plans for the world’s next big particle collider on hold

    Physicists awaiting approval to build the world’s first “Higgs factory” will have to wait a while longer.

    Japan had been expected to decide by March 7 whether it would host the International Linear Collider — a particle smasher that would produce subatomic particles called Higgs bosons far more efficiently than CERN’s Large Hadron Collider. Instead, Japanese officials encouraged the...

    03/07/2019 - 12:32 Physics, Technology
  • News in Brief

    Tiny bits of iron may explain why some icebergs are green

    Scientists may have finally figured out why some icebergs are green. Iron oxides could create the emerald hue.

    Icebergs often appear mostly white because light bounces off air bubbles trapped inside the ice. But pure ice — ice without air bubbles that often forms on a berg’s underside — appears blue because it absorbs longer light wavelengths (warm colors like red and orange) and...

    03/06/2019 - 11:00 Oceans, Chemistry, Ecology
  • News

    Hidden ancient neutrinos may shape the patterns of galaxies

    Shadowy messengers from the Big Bang have seemingly left their mark on ring-shaped patterns imprinted on the sky.

    Subatomic particles called neutrinos, released just one second after the universe’s birth 13.8 billion years ago, continually stream through the universe and are exceedingly hard to spot. But circular patterns of galaxies scattered across the sky reveal signs of the shy...

    03/04/2019 - 11:00 Cosmology, Physics, Astronomy
  • Science Visualized

    Here’s how long the periodic table’s unstable elements last

    On the periodic table, most elements have at least one stable form. But others have only unstable forms, all of which decay by emitting radiation and transforming into different elements until becoming one that’s stable. The timescale of radioactive decay is known as an element’s half-life, the time it takes for a sample of an element to be reduced by half.

    Generally for the elements...

    03/01/2019 - 11:02 Chemistry, Physics
  • Feature

    Extreme elements push the boundaries of the periodic table

    The rare radioactive substance made its way from the United States to Russia on a commercial flight in June 2009. Customs officers balked at accepting the package, which was ensconced in lead shielding and emblazoned with bold-faced warnings and the ominous trefoil symbols for ionizing radiation. Back it went across the Atlantic.

    U.S. scientists enclosed additional paper work and the...

    02/27/2019 - 06:00 Chemistry, Physics
  • Editor's Note

    Scientists set sail for the elusive island of stability

    On March 6, 1869, Dmitrii Mendeleev’s periodic table was unveiled, and we’ve launched a yearlong celebration of the 150th anniversary of his iconic work. In this issue, we’re looking ahead to imagine the periodic table of the future, as scientists strive to create bizarre new elements. And we also set ourselves a science visualization challenge: charting the half-lives of all the...
    02/26/2019 - 06:15 Science & Society, Chemistry, Physics