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E.g., 04/19/2019
E.g., 04/19/2019
Your search has returned 347 images:
  • Kazunori Akiyama
  • ALMA telescope
  • illustration of a black hole
Your search has returned 962 articles:
  • The Science Life

    Meet one of the first scientists to see the historic black hole image

    It’s hard to say which scientist was the first to set eyes on the glowing ring that makes up the world’s first image of a black hole. But astrophysicist Kazunori Akiyama was certainly one of the earliest.

    The image, released to the public on April 10, revealed the dark shadow of the supermassive black hole encircled by swirling gas at the center of the galaxy M87 (SN Online: 4/10/19)....

    04/11/2019 - 16:02 Astronomy, Physics
  • News

    How scientists took the first picture of a black hole

    Black holes are extremely camera shy. Supermassive black holes, ensconced in the centers of galaxies, make themselves visible by spewing bright jets of charged particles or by flinging away or ripping up nearby stars. Up close, these behemoths are surrounded by glowing accretion disks of infalling material. But because a black hole’s extreme gravity prevents light from escaping, the dark...

    04/10/2019 - 09:57 Astronomy, Physics, Technology
  • News

    All you need to know about the history of black holes

    Black holes have been beguiling from the very beginning.

    Hinted at as early as the 1780s and predicted by Einstein’s general theory of relativity, they didn’t get the name we know today until the 1960s. Bizarre beasts that squash gobs of matter into infinitely dense abysses, black holes were once thought to be merely a mathematical curiosity.

    But astronomers tallied up evidence for...

    04/10/2019 - 09:14 Astronomy, Physics
  • News

    The first picture of a black hole opens a new era of astrophysics

    Editor's note: This story will be updated throughout the day as more information becomes available. 

    This is what a black hole looks like.

    A world-spanning network of telescopes called the Event Horizon Telescope zoomed in on the supermassive monster in the galaxy M87 to create this first-ever picture of a black hole.

    “We have seen what we thought was unseeable. We have seen...

    04/10/2019 - 09:10 Astronomy, Physics
  • News

    How deadly, fast-moving flows of volcanic rock and gas cheat friction

    Dumping literal tons of hot volcanic material down a lab flume may finally have revealed how searing mixtures of hot gas and rock travel so far from volcanic eruptions.

    These pyroclastic flows can travel tens to hundreds of kilometers over rough terrain and even uphill (SN: 7/7/18, p. 32). Despite being made of gritty volcanic rock, “they seem to have as much friction with the ground as...

    04/08/2019 - 11:00 Earth, Physics
  • News in Brief

    The LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors are back on

    It’s open season in scientists’ hunt for gravitational waves.

    A trio of detectors are back on the lookout for the ripples in spacetime. And the newly souped-up machines could make this the most productive search yet.

    The two detectors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, LIGO, located in Hanford, Wash., and Livingston, La., and the Virgo detector,...

    04/01/2019 - 11:22 Physics, Astronomy
  • News

    4 things we’ll learn from the first closeup image of a black hole

    Editor's note: On April 10, the Event Horizon Telescope collaboration released a picture of the supermassive black hole at the center of galaxy M87. Read the full story here.

    We’re about to see the first close-up of a black hole.

    The Event Horizon Telescope, a network of eight radio observatories spanning the globe, has set its sights on a pair of behemoths: Sagittarius A*, the...

    03/29/2019 - 09:58 Astronomy, Physics
  • News in Brief

    Ultraprecise atomic clocks put Einstein’s special relativity to the test

    The ticktock of two ultraprecise clocks has proven Einstein right, once again.

    A pair of atomic clocks made of single ions of ytterbium kept pace with one another over six months, scientists report March 13 in Nature. The timepieces’ reliability supports a principle known as Lorentz symmetry. That principle was the foundation for Einstein’s special theory of relativity, which describes...

    03/13/2019 - 14:00 Physics
  • News in Brief

    Scientists have chilled tiny electronics to a record low temperature

    BOSTON — ­Today’s nanoelectronics weather forecast: positively frigid.

    Tiny electronic chips have been cooled to a record low temperature, dipping below a thousandth of a kelvin for the first time ever, scientists reported March 6 at a meeting of the American Physical Society.

    To reach the frosty temperature, the scientists incorporated tiny bits of metal on the chip, which act...

    03/08/2019 - 15:37 Physics
  • Science Visualized

    How droplets of oil or water can glow vibrant colors

    Oil and water may not mix, but the two have now revealed a new example of structural color, in which an object’s hue arises from its shape.

    Studying droplets made of two layers of clear oil, researchers discovered that, depending on a viewer’s perspective, the tiny blobs glowed a variety of vibrant colors under white light. In a petri dish, same-sized droplets changed color as the dish...

    03/08/2019 - 14:00 Physics, Materials