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Your search has returned 317 articles:
  • Science Ticker

    Neandertals had an eye for patterns

    Neandertals knew how to kick it up a couple of notches. Between 38,000 and 43,000 years ago, these close evolutionary relatives of humans added two notches to five previous incisions on a raven bone to produce an evenly spaced sequence, researchers say.

    This visually consistent pattern suggests Neandertals either had an eye for pleasing-looking displays or saw some deeper symbolic...

    03/29/2017 - 14:00 Anthropology, Archaeology
  • News in Brief

    Palace remains in Mexico point to ancient rise of centralized power

    Remnants of a royal palace in southern Mexico, dating to between around 2,300 and 2,100 years ago, come from what must have been one of the Americas’ earliest large, centralized governments, researchers say.

    Excavations completed in 2014 at El Palenque uncovered a palace with separate areas where a ruler conducted affairs of state and lived with his family, say archaeologists Elsa...

    03/27/2017 - 15:10 Archaeology
  • News

    Ancient Romans may have been cozier with Huns than they let on

    Nomadic warriors and herders known as the Huns are described in historical accounts as having instigated the fifth century fall of the Roman Empire under Attila’s leadership. But the invaders weren’t always so fierce. Sometimes they shared rather than fought with the Romans, new evidence suggests.

    Huns and farmers living around the Roman Empire’s eastern border, where the Danube River...

    03/24/2017 - 11:38 Archaeology, Anthropology
  • Science Ticker

    Ancient dental plaque tells tales of Neandertal diet and disease

    Dental plaque preserved in fossilized teeth confirms that Neandertals were flexible eaters and may have self-medicated with an ancient equivalent of aspirin.

    DNA recovered from calcified plaque on teeth from four Neandertal individuals suggest that those from the grasslands around Beligum’s Spy cave ate woolly rhinoceros and wild sheep, while their counterparts from the forested El...

    03/08/2017 - 13:22 Archaeology, Microbiology, Evolution
  • News

    Ancient nomadic herders beat a path to the Silk Road

    Nomadic herders took the ancient Silk Road to new heights.

    Starting 4,000 years ago or more, Central Asian herders routinely migrated from highland pastures in summer to lowland areas in winter (SN: 5/3/14, p. 15). Over roughly the next 2,000 years, those routes through mountainous regions eventually became a key part of the Silk Road, an ancient trade and travel network stretching from...

    03/08/2017 - 13:00 Archaeology, Anthropology
  • News

    If you think the Amazon jungle is completely wild, think again

    Welcome to the somewhat civilized jungle. Plant cultivation by native groups has shaped the landscape of at least part of South America’s Amazon forests for more than 8,000 years, researchers say.

    Of dozens of tree species partly or fully domesticated by ancient peoples, 20 kinds of fruit and nut trees still cover large chunks of Amazonian forests, say ecologist Carolina Levis of the...

    03/03/2017 - 07:00 Ecology, Archaeology
  • News in Brief

    Cow carved in stone paints picture of Europe’s early human culture

    This stone engraving of an aurochs, or wild cow, found in a French rock-shelter in 2012, provides glimpses of an ancient human culture’s spread across Central and Western Europe, researchers say.

    Rows of dots partly cover the aurochs. A circular depression cut into the center of the animal’s body may have caused the limestone to split in two, says Stone Age art specialist Raphaëlle...

    02/03/2017 - 07:00 Archaeology, Human Evolution
  • News

    Iron Age secrets exhumed from riches-filled crypt

    Discoveries in a richly appointed 2,600-year-old burial chamber point to surprisingly close ties between Central Europe’s earliest cities and Mediterranean societies. Dated to 583 B.C., this grave also helps pin down when people inhabited what may have been the first city north of the Alps.

    An array of fine jewelry, luxury goods and even a rare piece of horse armor found in the grave...

    02/02/2017 - 14:00 Archaeology, Anthropology
  • Reviews & Previews

    Real-life adventure tale details search for legendary city

    The Lost City of the Monkey GodDouglas PrestonGrand Central Publishing, $28

    Legend has it that hundreds of years ago, a rich, powerful city stood in the jungle of what is now eastern Honduras. Then, suddenly, all of the residents vanished, and the abandoned city became a cursed place — anyone who entered risked death.

    In a captivating real-life adventure tale, journalist and...

    01/22/2017 - 08:00 Archaeology, Anthropology, Health
  • News

    Hunter-gatherers were possibly first to call Tibetan Plateau home

    People hunted and foraged year-round in the thin air of China’s Tibetan Plateau at least 7,400 to 8,400 years ago, a new study suggests. And permanent settlers of the high-altitude region might even have arrived as early as 12,000 to 13,000 years ago.

    Three lines of dating evidence indicate that humans occupied the central Tibetan Plateau’s Chusang site, located more than 4,000 meters...

    01/05/2017 - 14:00 Archaeology, Anthropology