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  • Science of racism exhibit in Paris
Your search has returned 536 articles:
  • News

    Even short-term opioid use can set people up for addiction risks

    Even though a sprained ankle rarely needs an opioid, a new study of emergency room patients found that about 7 percent of patients got sent home with a prescription for the potentially addictive painkiller anyway. And the more pills prescribed, the greater the chance the prescription would be refilled, raising concerns about continued use.

    The research adds to evidence that it’s hard for...

    05/19/2017 - 09:00 Health, Science & Society
  • News

    Where you live can affect your blood pressure, study suggests

    For black adults, moving out of a racially segregated neighborhood is linked to a drop in blood pressure, according to a new study. The finding adds to growing evidence of an association between a lack of resources in many predominately black neighborhoods and adverse health conditions among their residents, such as diabetes and obesity.

    Systolic blood pressure — the pressure in blood...

    05/15/2017 - 19:21 Biomedicine, Health, Science & Society
  • Exhibit

    New museum exhibit explores science of racism

    In a famous series of experiments conducted in the 1970s, social psychologist Henri Tajfel asked how little it would take to persuade one group of people to discriminate against another. The answer was almost nothing. Having assigned boys to two groups based largely on random criteria, he asked them to play a game. Each boy had to decide how many pennies to give to members of his own group and...

    05/14/2017 - 08:00 Science & Society, Anthropology, Psychology
  • News

    In Florida, they’re fighting mosquitoes by meddling with their sex lives

    Near Key West, Fla., mosquito-control officers are trying something new. They’re releasing more mosquitoes.

    In a 12-week test running through early July, 40,000 male mosquitoes are being released each week with the eventual goal of preventing the spread of mosquito-borne diseases such as Zika and dengue.

    Instead of trying to kill the mosquitoes directly, a losing battle in Florida...

    05/08/2017 - 07:00 Animals, Health, Science & Society
  • Editor's Note

    March highlights questions about benefits of science

    On April 22, tens of thousands of scientists and science enthusiasts marched for science in Washington, D.C., and in other cities around the globe. Many participants expressed overtly political messages, but, as Science News reported live via Twitter from the National Mall, many marchers also focused on how much they value science. People gathered en masse in part to recognize science as a...

    05/03/2017 - 11:30 Science & Society
  • Science & the Public

    HPV vaccine as cancer prevention is a message that needs to catch on

    Cancer prevention isn’t the first thing that comes to many parents’ minds when they consider vaccinating their preteens against human papillomavirus, or HPV. And the fact that HPV is transmitted sexually gives the vaccine more baggage than a crowded international flight. But what gets lost in the din is the goal of vaccination, to protect adolescents from infection with HPV types that are...

    04/28/2017 - 12:00 Science & Society, Health, Cancer
  • Science & the Public

    We went to the March for Science in D.C. Here's what happened

    */ [View the story "The March for Science, Washington, D.C." on Storify]
    04/22/2017 - 19:02 Science & Society
  • Science Ticker

    Watch the March for Science in Washington, D.C.

    Science News will be on the scene at the April 22 March for Science in Washington, D.C.  Follow us on Twitter (@ScienceNews) and watch the live stream below.  

    The march may be “unprecedented,” sociologist Kelly Moore told Rachel Ehrenberg for a blog post giving a historical perspective on scientists' activism. “This is the first time in American history where scientists have taken to...

    04/22/2017 - 06:00 Science & Society
  • Science & the Public

    March for Science will take scientists’ activism to a new level

    Lab coats aren’t typical garb for mass demonstrations, but they may be on full display April 22. That’s when thousands of scientists, science advocates and science-friendly citizens are expected to flood the streets in the March for Science. Billed by organizers as both a celebration of science and part of a movement to defend science’s vital role in society, the event will include rallies and...

    04/19/2017 - 16:03 Science & Society
  • News

    New tech harvests drinking water from (relatively) dry air using only sunlight

    A new device the size of a coffee mug can generate drinkable water from desert air using nothing but sunlight.

    With this kind of device, "you can harvest the equivalent of a Coke can’s worth of water in an hour,” says cocreator Omar Yaghi, a chemist at the University of California, Berkeley. “That’s about how much water a person needs to survive in the desert.”

    Though that may not...

    04/13/2017 - 14:00 Chemistry, Sustainability, Materials, Science & Society