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E.g., 11/14/2018
E.g., 11/14/2018
Your search has returned 929 images:
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Your search has returned 3132 articles:
  • News

    A massive crater hides beneath Greenland’s ice

    There’s something big lurking beneath Greenland’s ice. Using airborne ice-penetrating radar, scientists have discovered a 31-kilometer-wide crater — larger than the city of Paris — buried under as much as 930 meters of ice in northwest Greenland.

    The meteorite that slammed into Earth and formed the pit would have been about 1.5 kilometers across, researchers say. That’s large enough to...

    11/14/2018 - 14:00 Earth, Climate
  • Feature

    How mammoths competed with other animals and lost

    The Gray Fossil Site, a sinkhole in northeastern Tennessee, is full of prehistoric treasures. Between 7 million and 4.5 million years ago, rhinoceroses, saber-toothed cats and other creatures, even red pandas, perished here by the edge of a pond. But that bounty of fossils pales next to the site’s biggest find: a mastodon’s skeleton, nearly 5 million years old, preserved in exquisite detail...

    11/13/2018 - 12:30 Ecosystems, Archaeology, Paleontology
  • News

    Climate change may have made the Arctic deadlier for baby shorebirds

    Climate change may be flipping good Arctic neighborhoods into killing fields for baby birds.

    Every year, shorebirds migrate thousands of kilometers from their southern winter refuges to reach Arctic breeding grounds. But what was once a safer region for birds that nest on the ground now has higher risks from predators than nesting in the tropics, says Vojtěch Kubelka, an evolutionary...

    11/13/2018 - 10:45 Animals, Climate
  • Science Stats

    Car tires and brake pads produce harmful microplastics

    There’s a big problem where the rubber meets the road: microplastics.

    Scientists analyzed more than 500 small particles pulled from the air around three busy German highways, and found that the vast majority — 89 percent — came from vehicle tires, brake systems and roads themselves. All together, these particles are classified by the researchers as microplastics, though they include...

    11/12/2018 - 08:38 Pollution, Technology
  • Say What?

    These tiny, crackly bubbles are a new type of volcanic ash

    Bread-crust bubble\Bred krəst ˈbəb(ə)l\ n.

    Tiny, gas-filled beads of volcanic ash with a scaly surface.

    Scientists have identified a new type of volcanic ash that erupted from a volcano in central Oregon roughly 7 million years ago. The particles are similar to larger bread-crust bombs, which form as gases trapped inside globs of lava expand, cracking the bombs’ tough exterior. Bread-...

    11/09/2018 - 12:00 Earth
  • News in Brief

    Bizarre metals may help unlock mysteries of how Earth’s magnetic field forms

    Weird materials called Weyl metals might reveal the secrets of how Earth gets its magnetic field.

    The substances could generate a dynamo effect, the process by which a swirling, electrically conductive material creates a magnetic field, a team of scientists reports in the Oct. 26 Physical Review Letters.

    Dynamos are common in the universe, producing the magnetic fields of the Earth...

    11/07/2018 - 06:00 Condensed Matter, Earth
  • Reviews & Previews

    ‘End of the Megafauna’ examines why so many giant Ice Age animals went extinct

    End of the MegafaunaRoss D.E. MacPhee and Peter Schouten (illustrator)W.W. Norton & Co., $35

    Today’s land animals are a bunch of runts compared with creatures from the not-too-distant past. Beasts as big as elephants, gorillas and bears were once much more common around the world. Then, seemingly suddenly, hundreds of big species, including the woolly mammoth, the giant ground...

    11/06/2018 - 09:00 Paleontology, Animals, Climate
  • News in Brief

    Physicists measured Earth’s mass using neutrinos for the first time

    Puny particles have given scientists a glimpse inside the Earth.

    For the first time, physicists have measured the planet’s mass using neutrinos, minuscule subatomic particles that can pass straight through the entire planet. Researchers also used the particles to probe the Earth’s innards, studying how the planet’s density varies from crust to core.

    Typically, scientists determine...

    11/05/2018 - 11:00 Particle Physics, Earth
  • News

    New devices could help turn atmospheric CO2 into useful supplies

    New chemical-recycling devices might help combat climate change by making good use of heat-trapping gas produced by burning fossil fuels.

    These electrochemical cells convert carbon monoxide into useful compounds much more efficiently than their predecessors, researchers report online October 25 in Joule. If combined with existing technology that harvests carbon monoxide from carbon...

    10/30/2018 - 06:00 Chemistry, Sustainability
  • Reviews & Previews

    ‘18 Miles’ is full of interesting tales about Earth’s atmosphere

    18 MilesChristopher DewdneyECW Press, $17.95

    How thick is Earth’s atmosphere? Sorry, that’s a bit of a trick question: Our planet’s air simply gets thinner with altitude, fading away to nothingness somewhere far above the height at which the lowest satellites orbit. It’s a fact, though, that 99 percent of Earth’s air lies below an altitude of 18 miles. Naturalist Christopher...

    10/28/2018 - 08:00 Climate, Earth, History of Science