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E.g., 07/17/2019
Your search has returned 1031 images:
  • Noctilucent clouds
  • flooding in Miami Beach
  • solar panels
Your search has returned 6417 articles:
  • Science Visualized

    Night-shining ‘noctilucent’ clouds have crept south this summer

    High in the sky, sunlit wisps remain aglow even after sundown. This summer, a surprising number of such noctilucent, or “night-shining,” clouds have been spotted in the Northern Hemisphere — and, unusually, as far south as Oklahoma and New Mexico, scientists report.

    These clouds typically float in the mesosphere about 80 kilometers above Earth’s surface, and are visible at high latitudes...

    07/16/2019 - 10:00 Earth, Climate, Planetary Science
  • News

    ‘Sunny day’ high tide floods are on the rise along U.S. coasts

    As sea levels continue to rise, many coastal U.S. cities will see an increasing number of days each year that streets flood during high tides, according to the U.S. National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration. For many parts of the country, particularly along the U.S. East Coast, that increase has already ramped up over the last two decades.

    From 2000 to 2019, these “sunny-day...

    07/15/2019 - 13:01 Climate
  • News

    This solar-powered device produces energy and cleans water at the same time

    By mounting a water distillation system on the back of a solar cell, engineers have constructed a device that doubles as an energy generator and water purifier.

    While the solar cell harvests sunlight for electricity, heat from the solar panel drives evaporation in the water distiller below. That vapor wafts through a porous polystyrene membrane that filters out salt and other...

    07/12/2019 - 08:00 Technology, Sustainability
  • News

    3 questions seismologists are asking after the California earthquakes

    A week after two large earthquakes rattled southern California, scientists are scrambling to understand the sequence of events that led to the temblors and what it might tell us about future quakes.

    A magnitude 6.4 quake struck July 4 near Ridgecrest — about 194 kilometers northeast of Los Angeles — followed by a magnitude 7.1 quake in the same region on July 5. Both quakes occurred not...

    07/12/2019 - 06:00 Earth
  • News in Brief

    Southern right whale moms and calves may whisper to evade orcas

    Whales are known for belting out sounds in the deep. But they may also whisper. 

    Southern right whale moms steer their calves to shallow waters, where newborns are less likely to be picked off by an orca. There, crashing waves mask the occasional quiet calls that the pairs make. That may help the whales stick together without broadcasting their location to predators, researchers report...

    07/11/2019 - 11:00 Animals, Evolution, Oceans
  • News

    A mysterious coral disease is ravaging Caribbean reefs

    Divers monitoring coral reefs off St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands in January noticed something alarming: Big white lesions were eating into the colorful tissues of hundreds of stony corals. Some corals were dead by the next day — only their stark white skeletons remained. Others languished for up to two weeks. Within four months, more than half of the reef suffered the same demise.

    ...
    07/09/2019 - 06:00 Oceans, Ecosystems, Climate
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers wanted to know about asteroids, lithium batteries and more

    Heat keepers

    Long ago, molten iron could have erupted from metal asteroids in a process scientists refer to as ferrovolcanism, Lisa Grossman reported in “Metal asteroids may have once had iron-spewing volcanoes (SN: 5/11/19 & 5/25/19, p. 5). 

    “In the cold vastness of space, how long are these rocks expected to keep their thermal energy?” asked online reader Bronze Condor.

    ...

    07/06/2019 - 06:15 Planetary Science, Earth, Neuroscience
  • News

    The largest seaweed bloom ever detected spanned the Atlantic in 2018

    During the summer, vast, floating islands of Sargassum algae can blanket entire parts of the tropical Atlantic Ocean. The algae reached their largest extent on record in June 2018, forming a giant brown belt that extended for 8,850 kilometers from the west coast of Africa into the Gulf of Mexico. At least 20 million metric tons of Sargassum made up the belt, the largest bloom of seaweed ever...

    07/04/2019 - 14:00 Oceans
  • News in Brief

    Europe’s latest heat wave has been linked to climate change

    Climate change made it five times more likely that Europe would experience a powerful heat wave like the one that baked the region in June, an international team of scientists reports.

    The findings, released July 2 by the World Weather Attribution Network, tackle the tricky question of how the heat wave might have been linked to global warming (SN Online: 6/2/19). The extreme weather...

    07/02/2019 - 13:26 Climate
  • News

    CO2 emissions are on track to take us beyond 1.5 degrees of global warming

    A new study shows just how hard it may be to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius over preindustrial times.

    The world’s existing power plants, industrial equipment, vehicles and other CO₂-emitters are on track to pump out enough carbon dioxide to blow past that target by midcentury, researchers report July 1 in Nature.  Add in future power plants that are already planned,...

    07/01/2019 - 11:00 Climate