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E.g., 09/20/2017
E.g., 09/20/2017
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  • air pollution
  • Harding Icefield in Alaska
  • chicken farm
Your search has returned 2932 articles:
  • Feature

    The list of diseases linked to air pollution is growing

    To the residents of Donora, Pa., a mill town in a crook of the Monongahela River, the daily haze from nearby zinc and steel plants was the price of keeping their families fed. But on October 27, 1948, the city awoke to an unusually sooty sky, even for Donora. The next day, the high school quarterbacks couldn’t see their teammates well enough to complete a single pass.

    The town was...

    09/19/2017 - 07:00 Pollution, Climate, Health
  • News

    Now we know how much glacial melting ‘watermelon snow’ can cause

    Microbes are pushing glacial snow into the red.

    An algae species that grows on glaciers gives the snow a crimson hue, which increases the amount of sunlight that the snow soaks up and makes it melt faster, new measurements confirm. On Alaska’s Harding Icefield, these microbes are responsible for about a sixth of the snowmelt in algae-tinged areas, researchers report September 18 in...

    09/18/2017 - 17:03 Microbes, Climate
  • Reviews & Previews

    ‘Big Chicken’ chronicles the public health dangers of using antibiotics in farming

    Big ChickenMaryn McKennaNational Geographic, $27

    Journalist Maryn McKenna opens Big Chicken by teasing our taste buds with a description of the succulent roasted chickens she bought at an open-air market in Paris. The birds tasted nothing like the bland, uniform chicken offered at U.S. grocery stores. This meat had an earthy, lush, animal flavor. From this tantalizing oh-so-European...

    09/17/2017 - 08:00 Agriculture, Health, Science & Society
  • Science & the Public

    How hurricanes and other devastating disasters spur scientific research

    Every day, it seems like there’s a new natural disaster in the headlines. Hurricane Harvey inundates Texas. Hurricane Irma plows through the Caribbean and the U.S. south, and Jose is hot on its heels. A deadly 8.1-magnitude earthquake rocks Mexico. Wildfires blanket the western United States in choking smoke.

    While gripping tales of loss and heroism rightly fill the news, another story...

    09/12/2017 - 17:15 Earth, Oceans, Science & Society
  • Science Stats

    Air pollution takes a toll on solar energy

    Air pollution is a drag for renewable energy. Dust and other sky-darkening air pollutants slash solar energy production by 17 to 25 percent across parts of India, China and the Arabian Peninsula, a new study estimates. The haze can block sunlight from reaching solar panels. And if the particles land on a panel’s flat surface, they cut down on the area exposed to the sun. Dust can come from...

    09/08/2017 - 09:00 Pollution, Sustainability
  • It's Alive

    Rising temperatures threaten heat-tolerant aardvarks

    When nocturnal aardvarks start sunbathing, something’s wrong.

    If the animals are desperate enough to bask like some cold, sluggish turtle, it’s because they’ve got the chills. Robyn Hetem, an ecophysiologist, has the body temperature data to prove it — collected from late 2012 into 2013, the hottest summer the arid Kalahari region in South Africa had seen in more than 30 years.

    ...

    09/06/2017 - 07:00 Climate, Ecology, Animals
  • Reviews & Previews

    North America’s largest recorded earthquake helped confirm plate tectonics

    The Great QuakeHenry FountainCrown, $28

    In the early evening of March 27, 1964, a magnitude 9.2 earthquake roiled Alaska. For nearly five minutes, the ground shuddered violently in what was, and still is, the second biggest temblor in recorded history.

    Across the southern part of the state, land cracked and split, lifting some areas nearly 12 meters — about as high as a telephone...

    09/03/2017 - 08:00 Earth, History of Science
  • Science Visualized

    How deep water surfaces around Antarctica

    View the video

    There’s no signpost to mark it, but about 3,000 meters underwater off the southeast coast of South America, a stream of deep water from the Atlantic Ocean spills into the Southern Ocean. Now new maps reveal in 3-D how the path of that water, called the North Atlantic Deep Water, spirals southeastward and up toward the surface around Antarctica.

    The incoming water,...

    09/01/2017 - 13:00 Oceans, Climate
  • Science Ticker

    Ancient mud documents the legacy of Rome’s lead pipes

    Just as modern cities struggle with lead pollution, so may have ancient Rome. And muddy waters preserved the city’s legacy of lead pipes, a new study suggests.

    Researchers examined lead levels in dirt drilled from two Roman harbor sites, Ostia and Portus, on the Tiber River. The samples spanned 1000 B.C. to A.D. 1000. Up until around 200 B.C., harbor waters were pristine, but then...

    08/28/2017 - 16:36 Archaeology, Pollution
  • News

    On a mountain in Wyoming, the eclipse brings wonder — and, hopefully, answers

    View the video

    CASPER MOUNTAIN, Wyo. — It’s nothing like a sunset. It’s cold and dark, but it’s not like nighttime, or even twilight. The moon just snaps into place over the last slivers of the sun, turning the sun into a dark hole. The only illumination — a flat, ghostly, metallic sort of light — is from peaked gossamer streamers stretching out toward the edges of the sky.

    I’ve...

    08/21/2017 - 19:38 Astronomy, Earth