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E.g., 10/22/2018
E.g., 10/22/2018
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  • tornado
  • a photo of Angkor Wat temple
  • mounds in the rock record
Your search has returned 3120 articles:
  • News in Brief

    More tornadoes are popping up east of the Mississippi

    Twisters are twirling away from Tornado Alley.

    From 1979 to 2017, annual tornado frequency slightly decreased over the region, which stretches across the central and southern Great Plains of the United States, a study finds. Conversely, a higher number of storms touched down in areas east of the Mississippi River over the same period, researchers report October 17 in npj Climate and...

    10/18/2018 - 10:56 Climate
  • News

    The water system that helped Angkor rise may have also brought its fall

    At the medieval city of Angkor, flooding after decades of scant rainfall triggered a devastating breakdown of the largest water system in the preindustrial world, new evidence suggests.

    Intense monsoon rains bracketed by decades of drought in the 1400s set off a chain reaction of failures in Angkor’s interconnected water network, computer simulations indicate. The climate-induced...

    10/17/2018 - 14:00 Archaeology, Climate, Sustainability
  • News

    These ancient mounds may not be the earliest fossils on Earth after all

    Tiny mounds touted as the earliest fossilized evidence of life on Earth may just be twisted rock.

    Found in 3.7-billion-year-old rocks in Greenland, the mounds strongly resemble cone-shaped microbial mats called stromatolites, researchers reported in 2016. But a new analysis of the shape, internal layers and chemistry of the structures suggests that the mounds weren’t shaped by microbes...

    10/17/2018 - 13:00 Earth, Paleontology, Microbes
  • News in Brief

    Add beer to the list of foods threatened by climate change

    Beer lovers could be left with a sour taste, thanks to the latest in a series of studies mapping the effects of climate change on crops.

    Malted barley — a key ingredient in beer including IPAs, stouts and pilsners — is particularly sensitive to warmer temperatures and drought, both of which are likely to increase due to climate change. As a result, average global barley crop yields could...

    10/15/2018 - 13:43 Agriculture, Climate
  • Science & the Public

    We’re probably undervaluing healthy lakes and rivers

    For sale: Pristine lake. Price negotiable.

    Most U.S. government attempts to quantify the costs and benefits of protecting the country’s bodies of water are likely undervaluing healthy lakes and rivers, researchers argue in a new study. That’s because some clean water benefits get left out of the analyses, sometimes because these benefits are difficult to pin numbers on. As a result, the...

    10/14/2018 - 08:00 Pollution, Science & Society
  • Science Ticker

    Here’s what’s unusual about Hurricane Michael

    Call it an October surprise: Hurricane Michael strengthened unusually quickly before slamming into the Florida panhandle on October 10 and remained abnormally strong as it swept into Georgia. The storm made landfall with sustained winds of about 250 kilometers per hour, just shy of a category 5 storm, making it the strongest storm ever to hit the region, according to the National Oceanographic...

    10/10/2018 - 17:53 Climate
  • News

    These light-loving bacteria may survive surprisingly deep underground

    Deep below Earth's surface, life finds a way.

    Traces of cyanobacteria have been found more than 600 meters underground in a rocky outcrop in Spain, suggesting the microbes can survive without sunlight. Instead of photosynthesizing like others of their kind, these light-starved microorganisms may create energy using hydrogen, researchers report October 1 in the Proceedings of the National...

    10/09/2018 - 16:13 Earth, Microbes
  • News in Brief

    The economics of climate change and tech innovation win U.S. pair a Nobel

    Two U.S. economists, William Nordhaus and Paul Romer, have received the 2018 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for their efforts to untangle the economics of climate change and technological innovations.

    Nordhaus and Romer “significantly broadened the scope of economic analysis by constructing models that explain how the market economy interacts with nature and knowledge,” the...

    10/08/2018 - 12:09 Science & Society, Climate
  • News

    Limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees versus 2 has big benefits, the IPCC says

    Half a degree can make a world of difference.

    If Earth warms by just 1.5 degrees Celsius over preindustrial times by 2100, rather than 2 degrees, we would see fewer life-threatening heat, drought and precipitation extremes, less sea level rise and fewer species lost.

    Those findings are detailed in a report, a summary of which was released October 8, by the Intergovernmental Panel...

    10/07/2018 - 21:00 Climate
  • News in Brief

    How wind power could contribute to a warming climate

    Giant wind turbines that generate fossil fuel–free power add a little heat of their own to the planet.

    If the United States sprouted enough wind turbines to meet its entire demand for electricity, the turbines would immediately raise the region’s surface air temperatures by 0.24 degrees Celsius, on average, scientists report online October 4 in Joule. In the short term, that’s not a...

    10/04/2018 - 11:16 Climate