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E.g., 06/19/2019
E.g., 06/19/2019
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  • Diplodocus in Smithsonian fossil hall
Your search has returned 1284 articles:
  • News

    The National Weather Service has launched its new U.S. forecasting model

    The National Weather Service has launched a powerful new weather forecasting model, just in time for the U.S. Atlantic hurricane season. But some meteorologists worry that, even after years of testing, the model is still not ready for prime time.

    Over the last year, the weather service has been testing the upgraded tool, using it to do retrospective forecasts of three hurricane seasons...

    06/12/2019 - 15:11 Climate
  • News

    Limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees C could prevent thousands of deaths in the U.S.

    Having the world meet a more stringent goal to limit global warming may prevent thousands of heat-related deaths in 15 major U.S. cities, a study shows. The projections illustrate the high risk from climate change faced by urban populations.

    Under the Paris Agreement, participating countries have pledged to curb greenhouse gas emissions with the aim of limiting warming to no more than 2...

    06/05/2019 - 14:00 Health, Climate
  • Exhibit

    The Smithsonian’s ‘Deep Time’ exhibit gives dinosaurs new life

    After five years, the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., is finally reopening its dinosaur hall on June 8. Visitors may come for fan favorites like Tyrannosaurus rex and Stegosaurus — and these fossils are gorgeously presented. But the new, permanent exhibition, the “David H. Koch Hall of Fossils — Deep Time,” has a much grander story to tell about the history...

    06/04/2019 - 12:17 Science & Society, Paleontology, Climate
  • Feature

    The Southern Ocean may be less of a carbon sink than we thought

    The vast stretch of icy water that separates Antarctica from other continents is a dark mystery to most people. Polar explorer Ernest Shackleton, one of the few who have been to the Southern Ocean, regarded its storm-wracked seas with fear and awe. After ice floes trapped and crushed the three-masted Endurance in 1915, Shackleton made an epic rescue attempt, sailing 1,300 kilometers to bring...

    06/02/2019 - 06:00 Climate, Earth, Oceans
  • News in Brief

    Thousands of birds perished in the Bering Sea. Arctic warming may be to blame

    Thousands of puffins and other seabirds in the Bering Sea appear to have died in the winter of 2016 to 2017. The birds look like they starved to death, but the ultimate culprit was probably climate change, scientists say.

    From October 2016 to January 2017, more than 350 dead birds, mostly tufted puffins, washed ashore at St. Paul Island, Alaska, on the Bering Sea. The birds were...

    05/31/2019 - 13:30 Climate
  • News in Brief

    Himalayan glacier melting threatens water security for millions of people

    Meltwater from glaciers in Asia’s high mountain ranges, including the Himalayas, meets the basic water needs of about 221 million people each year. But that store of freshwater is shrinking, a study finds, threatening regional water security within just a few decades.

    Glaciers can store water for decades or even centuries before releasing it into rivers, providing a steady supply to...

    05/29/2019 - 13:05 Climate
  • News in Brief

    This iconic Humboldt map may need crucial updates

    An influential diagram of plants growing on the slopes of some Andes Mountains needs an update, scientists say. Created 212 years ago by German explorer Alexander von Humboldt, the Tableau Physique is still used to study how plant ranges have shifted due to climate change.

    But the original diagram contains some big errors — including that some of the highest-altitude plants described as...

    05/27/2019 - 15:00 Earth, Climate
  • News in Brief

    Only a third of Earth’s longest rivers still run free

    Free-flowing rivers are an endangered species on Earth. Only about a third of the world’s longest rivers still flow freely along their entire lengths, unchained by dams or reservoirs, scientists report in the May 9 Nature.

    The study is the first global map of river “connectivity,” the ability of river water to move freely downstream, across floodplains and into and out of aquifers...

    05/10/2019 - 07:00 Earth, Climate
  • News in Brief

    Ancient South American populations dipped due to an erratic climate

    Ancient South American populations declined sharply as rainfall became increasingly unpredictable starting around 8,600 years ago, researchers say.

    But hunter-gatherer groups from the Andes and the Amazon to the continent’s southern tip bounced back quickly once rain returned to a relatively stable pattern about 6,000 years ago, report archaeologists Philip Riris and Manuel Arroyo-Kalin...

    05/09/2019 - 13:17 Archaeology, Climate
  • Science Stats

    1 million species are under threat. Here are 5 ways we speed up extinctions

    Stories about individual species on the brink of extinction may be all too familiar. But a new tally now reveals the breadth of the conservation crisis: One million of the world’s species are now poised to vanish, some as soon as within the next few decades.

    That number, which amounts to 1 in every 8 animal or plant species on Earth, comes from a sweeping new analysis of about 15,000...

    05/08/2019 - 06:00 Conservation, Climate, Pollution, Science & Society