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E.g., 07/08/2015
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  • Aging
  • sniff test
Your search has returned 4091 articles:
  • News

    Age isn’t just a number

    Some people age faster than others, a long-term study of New Zealanders reveals. But there’s good news for the rapid agers: Studies in mice indicate there may be ways to slow the aging rate.

    Like a class reunion photo, a physiological snapshot of 954 people born in Dunedin, New Zealand, in 1972 and 1973 shows that time has been kinder to some people. The calendar indicated all those...

    07/07/2015 - 07:00 Physiology, Health, Neuroscience
  • News

    Wrinkled brain mimics crumpled paper

    Cramming a big brain into a skull may be as easy as just wadding it up. The same physical rules that dictate how a paper ball crumples also describe how brains get their wrinkles, scientists suggest July 3 in Science.

    That insight, arrived at in part by balling up sheets of standard-sized A4 office paper...

    07/02/2015 - 14:00 Neuroscience
  • News

    Smell test may detect autism

    A 10-minute test could help doctors sniff out autism, a new study contends.

    Whether smelling roses or sour milk, children with autism inhale about the same amount of air, researchers report July 2 in Current Biology. In contrast, kids without the disorder breathe in pleasant scents more deeply than stinky ones.

    The...

    07/02/2015 - 12:00 Health, Mental Health, Neuroscience
  • Editor's Note

    E-cigarette reports provide science that society craves

    For much of the last year, the most-read story on sciencenews.org was not about a faraway exoplanet or a cunning creature’s adaptations to an exotic locale. It was a short report, in some ways unsurprising. In 26 different weeks since it appeared in June 2014,...

    07/01/2015 - 09:14 Health, Technology, Cancer
  • Letters to the Editor

    Puzzling cosmic signals, processed food defined and more reader feedback

    To edit or not

    A controversial paper about modifying genes in fertilized human eggs raised some serious ethical concerns. Tina Hesman Saey covered researchers’ arguments for and against this type of...

    07/01/2015 - 09:14 Cells, Nutrition, Astronomy
  • Science Ticker

    Clot-snatching stroke treatment gets the green light

    Doctors may soon use a small device to snatch blood clots from the brain. On June 29, the American Heart Association and the American Stroke Association issued guidelines recommending the use of the treatment in...

    06/30/2015 - 16:42 Health
  • Science Ticker

    Old fruit flies’ swagger restored with brain chemical dopamine

    The chemical messenger dopamine can bring back that loving feeling for old fruit flies. By carefully boosting dopamine levels in a handful of specific brain cells, scientists coaxed male flies past their prime into wooing females more vigorously.

    Tsai-Feng Fu of National Chi Nan University in Nantou, Taiwan, and colleagues engineered male fruit flies, Drosophila melanogaster, so...

    06/30/2015 - 14:34 Neuroscience
  • News in Brief

    Genetic tweak turned plague bacterium deadly

    Two genetic changes turned the plague into a scourge.  

    The ancestor of the plague-causing bacterium Yersinia pestis causes mild stomach disease. Early in its evolution, Y. pestis acquired a single gene from other bacteria that allowed it to cause the deadly lung infections of pneumonic plague, scientists ...

    06/30/2015 - 11:00 Health, Genetics, Evolution
  • Feature

    E-cigarettes proving to be a danger to teens

    They’ve appeared on television and in magazines — Katy Perry, Johnny Depp and other celebrities vaping electronic cigarettes. The high-tech gadgets, marketed as a healthier alternative to traditional cigarettes, seem to be available everywhere, from Internet suppliers and specialty vaping shops to 24-hour convenience marts.

    E-cigarettes have become the fashionable new electronic toy....

    06/30/2015 - 09:00 Health
  • Scicurious

    No matter the language, disease risk is hard to communicate

    At the beginning of June, my travel companion and I were lost somewhere in the bowels of the Seoul subway in South Korea. As we puzzled over a map we could barely read, a kind young woman, a surgical mask covering her nose and mouth, stopped and offered to help us find our way. As she led us to our next train, she looked at me seriously. “You should get one of these,” she said, gesturing to...

    06/29/2015 - 16:56 Science & Society, Health