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E.g., 09/20/2017
E.g., 09/20/2017
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  • HIV infecting a T cell
  • brown bat
  • air pollution
Your search has returned 4659 articles:
  • News

    By ganging up, HIV antibodies may defeat the virus

    For certain HIV antibodies, having a buddy or two makes a big difference in the fight against the virus.

    Combining the antibodies, called broadly neutralizing antibodies, may stop more strains of HIV than any single one can do alone, two new studies suggest. A “triple-threat” antibody molecule can bind to three different spots on the virus, researchers report online September 20 in...

    09/20/2017 - 14:30 Biomedicine, Immune Science
  • Feature

    Bat brain signals illuminate navigation in the dark

    Ninad Kothari’s workplace looks like something out of a sci-fi film. The graduate student at Johns Hopkins University works in a darkened, red-lit room, where he trains bats to fly through obstacle courses. Shielding within the walls keeps radio and other human-made signals from interfering with transmissions from the tiny electrical signals he’s recording from the bats’ brains as the animals...

    09/20/2017 - 12:30 Animals, Neuroscience
  • Feature

    The list of diseases linked to air pollution is growing

    To the residents of Donora, Pa., a mill town in a crook of the Monongahela River, the daily haze from nearby zinc and steel plants was the price of keeping their families fed. But on October 27, 1948, the city awoke to an unusually sooty sky, even for Donora. The next day, the high school quarterbacks couldn’t see their teammates well enough to complete a single pass.

    The town was...

    09/19/2017 - 07:00 Pollution, Climate, Health
  • Reviews & Previews

    ‘Big Chicken’ chronicles the public health dangers of using antibiotics in farming

    Big ChickenMaryn McKennaNational Geographic, $27

    Journalist Maryn McKenna opens Big Chicken by teasing our taste buds with a description of the succulent roasted chickens she bought at an open-air market in Paris. The birds tasted nothing like the bland, uniform chicken offered at U.S. grocery stores. This meat had an earthy, lush, animal flavor. From this tantalizing oh-so-European...

    09/17/2017 - 08:00 Agriculture, Health, Science & Society
  • News

    Animal goo inspires better glue

    Finding a great glue is a sticky task — especially if you want it to attach to something as slick as the inside of the human body. Even the strongest human-made adhesives don’t work well on wet surfaces like tissues and organs. For surgeons closing internal incisions, that’s more than an annoyance. The right glue could hold wounds together as effectively as stitches and staples with less...

    09/15/2017 - 12:00 Animals, Materials, Biomedicine
  • News

    A researcher reveals the shocking truth about electric eels

    View the video

    Kenneth Catania knows just how much it hurts to be zapped by an electric eel. For the first time, the biologist at Vanderbilt University in Nashville has measured the strength of a defensive electrical attack on a real-life potential predator — himself.

    Catania placed his arm in a tank with a 40-centimeter-long electric eel (relatively small as eels go) and...

    09/14/2017 - 14:14 Animals, Neuroscience
  • News in Brief

    Microbes hobble a widely used chemo drug

    Some bacteria may shield tumor cells against a common chemotherapy drug.

    Certain types of bacteria make an enzyme that inactivates the drug gemcitabine, researchers report in the Sept. 15 Science. Gemcitabine is used to treat patients with pancreatic, lung, breast and bladder cancers.

    Bacteria that produce the enzyme cytidine deaminase converted the drug to an inactive form. That...

    09/14/2017 - 14:00 Cancer, Microbiology
  • News

    When a fungus invades the lungs, immune cells can tell it to self-destruct

    Immune cells can turn certain invaders on themselves, forcing them to prematurely self-destruct, researchers have discovered.

    In mice, when white blood cells in the lungs engulf spores of a common airborne fungus, these immune cells release an enzyme that sends the fungal cells into programmed cell death. That prevents the spores from setting up shop in the lungs and sparking a...

    09/07/2017 - 17:01 Immune Science, Health
  • News

    Brain chemical lost in Parkinson’s may contribute to its own demise

    The brain chemical missing in Parkinson’s disease may have a hand in its own death. Dopamine, the neurotransmitter that helps keep body movements fluid, can kick off a toxic chain reaction that ultimately kills the nerve cells that make it, a new study suggests.

    By studying lab dishes of human nerve cells, or neurons, derived from Parkinson’s patients, researchers found that a harmful...

    09/07/2017 - 14:12 Brain, Biomedicine
  • Editor's Note

    Learning is a ubiquitous, mysterious phenomenon

    I’ll admit it. I’m addicted to learning. There’s nothing quite like the thrill that comes with finding out something new.

    It’s no surprise I ended up this way. My parents were public school teachers. They instilled in me the belief that education not only opens up new opportunities but also is enjoyable in itself. My parents regularly took my siblings and me to museums, encouraged us to...

    09/06/2017 - 13:15 Science & Society, Neuroscience