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E.g., 07/17/2019
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  • praying mantis
  • fish brain activity
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Your search has returned 1333 articles:
  • Science Visualized

    Tiny glasses help reveal how praying mantises can see in 3-D

    A praying mantis depends on precision targeting when hunting insects. Now, scientists have identified nerve cells that help calculate the depth perception required for these predators’ surgical strikes.

    In addition to providing clues about insect vision, the principles of these cells’ behavior, described June 28 in Nature Communications, may also lead to advances in robot vision or other...

    07/12/2019 - 10:00 Health, Neuroscience
  • News

    Both fish and humans have REM-like sleep

    No one should have to sleep with the fishes, but new research on zebrafish suggests that we sleep like them.

    Sleeping zebrafish have brain activity similar to both deep slow-wave sleep and rapid eye movement, or REM, sleep that’s found in mammals, researchers report July 10 in Nature. And the team may have tracked down the cells that kick off REM sleep.

    The findings suggest that...

    07/10/2019 - 13:38 Neuroscience, Physiology, Animals
  • Science Visualized

    A 100-hour MRI scan captured the most detailed look yet at a whole human brain

    Over 100 hours of scanning has yielded a 3-D picture of the whole human brain that’s more detailed than ever before. The new view, enabled by a powerful MRI, has the resolution potentially to spot objects that are smaller than 0.1 millimeters wide.

    “We haven’t seen an entire brain like this,” says electrical engineer Priti Balchandani of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New...

    07/08/2019 - 10:00 Neuroscience
  • Letters to the Editor

    Readers wanted to know about asteroids, lithium batteries and more

    Heat keepers

    Long ago, molten iron could have erupted from metal asteroids in a process scientists refer to as ferrovolcanism, Lisa Grossman reported in “Metal asteroids may have once had iron-spewing volcanoes (SN: 5/11/19 & 5/25/19, p. 5). 

    “In the cold vastness of space, how long are these rocks expected to keep their thermal energy?” asked online reader Bronze Condor.

    ...

    07/06/2019 - 06:15 Planetary Science, Earth, Neuroscience
  • News in Brief

    Rogue immune cells can infiltrate old brains

    Immune cells can storm into the brains of older mice, where these normally helpful cells seem to be up to no good. The result, described July 3 in Nature, raises the possibility that immune cells may have a role in aging.

    Anne Brunet of Stanford University School of Medicine and colleagues studied gene activity to identify all sorts of cells in a particular spot in mice brains — the...

    07/03/2019 - 13:00 Health, Neuroscience
  • News

    This brain region may be why some robots send chills down your spine

    A new analysis of brain scans may explain why hyperrealistic androids and animated characters can be creepy.

    By measuring people’s neural activity as they viewed pictures of humans and robots, researchers identified a region of the brain that seems to underlie the “uncanny valley” effect — the unsettling sensation sometimes caused by robots or animations that look almost, but not quite,...

    07/02/2019 - 12:00 Neuroscience, Technology
  • News in Brief

    Vision cells can pull double duty in the brain, detecting both color and shape

    Some nerve cells in the brain are multitaskers, responding to both color and shape, a survey of over 4,000 neurons in the visual systems of macaque monkeys finds.

    The finding, described in the June 28 Science, counters earlier ideas that vision cells nestled in the back of the brain each handle information about only one aspect of sight: an object’s color or its orientation, an element...

    07/01/2019 - 13:04 Health, Neuroscience
  • News

    In mice, a high-fat diet cuts a ‘brake’ used to control appetite

    A gut-busting diet may set the brain up for more of the same.

    After mice ate fatty food for just two weeks, cells in their brains that send a “stop eating” signal were quieter than those in mice that didn’t eat high-fat chow, researchers report in the June 28 Science. The result helps untangle the complex relationship between food and appetite, one that can become muddled when people...

    06/27/2019 - 14:00 Health, Neuroscience
  • News in Brief

    Mice and bats’ brains sync up as they interact with their own kind

    When animals are together, their brain activity aligns. These simpatico signals, described in bats and mice, bring scientists closer to understanding brains as they normally exist — enmeshed in complex social situations.

    Researchers know that neural synchrony emerges in people who are talking, taking a class together and even watching the same movie. But scientists tend to study human...

    06/20/2019 - 11:00 Neuroscience
  • News

    Female rats face sex bias too

    When researchers release a new finding about the brain, it’s often mice or rats who have run the mazes and taken the tests for science. People might wonder: Are rodents good substitutes for humans? Maybe for men, but what about women?

    That’s less likely, because most neuroscience experiments don’t use female rodents — a fact one scientist says comes from outdated ideas that should go...

    06/18/2019 - 08:00 Neuroscience