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E.g., 09/20/2017
E.g., 09/20/2017
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  • barn owl
  • Harding Icefield in Alaska
  • Polypterus
Your search has returned 4602 articles:
  • Science Ticker

    Old barn owls aren’t hard of hearing

    Barn owl ears age well. Unlike other animals, the birds don’t suffer from hearing loss as a hallmark of aging, a new study suggests.

    Beyond people, age-related hearing loss has been documented in mice, gerbils and chinchillas. Those deficits are linked to deterioration of the tiny hair cells that line the sensory layer of the eardrum. But some evidence hints that birds may not suffer...

    09/19/2017 - 19:05 Animals
  • News

    Now we know how much glacial melting ‘watermelon snow’ can cause

    Microbes are pushing glacial snow into the red.

    An algae species that grows on glaciers gives the snow a crimson hue, which increases the amount of sunlight that the snow soaks up and makes it melt faster, new measurements confirm. On Alaska’s Harding Icefield, these microbes are responsible for about a sixth of the snowmelt in algae-tinged areas, researchers report September 18 in...

    09/18/2017 - 17:03 Microbes, Climate
  • Rethink

    3-D scans of fossils suggest new fish family tree

    When it comes to some oddball fish, looks can be deceiving.

    Polypterus, today found only in Africa, and its close kin have generally been considered some of the most primitive ray-finned fishes alive, thanks in part to skeletal features that resemble those on some ancient fish. Now a new analysis of fish fossils of an early polypterid relative called Fukangichthys unearthed in China...

    09/18/2017 - 14:17 Animals, Evolution, Paleontology
  • News

    Animal goo inspires better glue

    Finding a great glue is a sticky task — especially if you want it to attach to something as slick as the inside of the human body. Even the strongest human-made adhesives don’t work well on wet surfaces like tissues and organs. For surgeons closing internal incisions, that’s more than an annoyance. The right glue could hold wounds together as effectively as stitches and staples with less...

    09/15/2017 - 12:00 Animals, Materials, Biomedicine
  • News

    A researcher reveals the shocking truth about electric eels

    View the video

    Kenneth Catania knows just how much it hurts to be zapped by an electric eel. For the first time, the biologist at Vanderbilt University in Nashville has measured the strength of a defensive electrical attack on a real-life potential predator — himself.

    Catania placed his arm in a tank with a 40-centimeter-long electric eel (relatively small as eels go) and...

    09/14/2017 - 14:14 Animals, Neuroscience
  • News

    Like sea stars, ancient echinoderms nibbled with tiny tube feet

    Sea stars and their relatives eat, breathe and scuttle around the seafloor with tiny tube feet. Now researchers have gotten their first-ever look at similar tentacle-like structures in an extinct group of these echinoderms.

    It was suspected that the ancient marine invertebrates, called edrioasteroids, had tube feet. But a set of unusually well-preserved fossils from around 430 million...

    09/12/2017 - 19:05 Paleontology, Animals
  • Science Ticker

    Why bats crash into windows

    View the video

    Walls can get the best of clumsy TV sitcom characters and bats alike.

    New lab tests suggest that smooth, vertical surfaces fool some bats into thinking their flight path is clear, leading to collisions and near misses.

    The furry fliers famously use sound to navigate — emitting calls and tracking the echoes to hunt for prey and locate obstacles. But some...

    09/07/2017 - 14:00 Animals, Biophysics
  • News in Brief

    Why bats crash into windows

    View the video

    Walls can get the best of clumsy TV sitcom characters and bats alike.

    New lab tests suggest that smooth, vertical surfaces fool some bats into thinking their flight path is clear, leading to collisions and near misses.

    The furry fliers famously use sound to navigate — emitting calls and tracking the echoes to hunt for prey and locate obstacles. But some...

    09/07/2017 - 14:00 Animals, Biophysics
  • News

    Woolly rhinos may have grown strange extra ribs before going extinct

    As time ran out for the woolly rhino, strange things happened. Before going extinct, some of the beasts faced an unusually high risk of growing bizarre ribs in their neck, a new study suggests. Those misplaced ribs might have signaled the animals’ impending demise.

    Scientists examined neck bones from 32 woolly rhinos and found indented spots on five of them where ribs had once attached...

    09/07/2017 - 11:00 Paleontology, Evolution, Physiology
  • Science Visualized

    Pollen hitches a ride on bees in all the right spots

    Bee bodies may be built just right to help pollen hitch a ride between flowers.

    For the first time, scientists have identified where and how much pollen is left behind on bees’ bodies after the insects groom themselves. These residual patches of pollen align with spots on bees’ bodies that touch flowers’ pollen-collecting reproductive parts, researchers report online September 6 in PLOS...

    09/06/2017 - 14:00 Animals, Plants