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E.g., 11/24/2017
E.g., 11/24/2017
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  • Rethink

    Bones show Dolly’s arthritis was normal for a sheep her age

    In the scientific version of her obituary, Dolly the Sheep was reported to have suffered from severe arthritis in her knees. The finding and Dolly’s early death from an infection led many researchers to think that cloning might cause animals to age prematurely.

    But new X-rays of Dolly’s skeleton and those of other cloned sheep and Dolly’s  naturally conceived daughter Bonnie indicate...

    11/23/2017 - 09:00 Genetics, Animals
  • News

    Current CRISPR gene drives are too strong for outdoor use, studies warn

    Gene-editing tools heralded as hope for fighting invader rats, malarial mosquitoes and other scourges may be too powerful to use in their current form, two new papers warn.

    Standard forms of CRISPR gene drives, as the tools are called, can make tweaked DNA race through a population so easily that a small number of stray animals or plants could spread it to new territory, predicts a...

    11/16/2017 - 15:00 Genetics, Conservation
  • News in Brief

    How dad’s stress changes his sperm

    Sperm from stressed-out dads can carry that stress from one generation to another. “But one question that really hasn’t been addressed is, ‘How do dad’s experiences actually change his germ cell?’” Jennifer Chan, a neuroendocrinologist at the University of Pennsylvania, said November 13 in Washington, D.C., at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience.

    Now, from a study in mice...

    11/15/2017 - 15:30 Health, Development
  • Feature

    How Asian nomadic herders built new Bronze Age cultures

    Nomadic herders living on western Asia’s hilly grasslands made a couple of big moves east and west around 5,000 years ago. These were not typical, back-and-forth treks from one seasonal grazing spot to another. These people blazed new trails.

    A technological revolution had transformed travel for ancient herders around that time. Of course they couldn’t make online hotel reservations....

    11/15/2017 - 12:00 Archaeology, Anthropology, Genetics
  • News

    These spiders may have the world’s fastest body clocks

    WASHINGTON, D.C. — If it takes you a while to recover from a few lost hours of sleep, be grateful you aren’t an orb weaver. 

    Three orb-weaving spiders — Allocyclosa bifurca, Cyclosa turbinata and Gasteracantha cancriformis — may have the shortest natural circadian rhythms discovered in an animal thus far, researchers reported November 12 at the Society for Neuroscience’s annual meeting...

    11/14/2017 - 16:00 Animals, Evolution, Development
  • News

    Ancient European farmers and foragers hooked up big time

    Thousands of years ago, hunter-gatherers native to Europe and incoming farmers from what’s now Turkey got up close and personal for a surprisingly long time, researchers say. This mixing reshaped the continent’s genetic profile differently from one region to another.

    Ancient DNA from foragers and farmers in eastern, central and western Europe indicates that they increasingly mated with...

    11/10/2017 - 07:00 Anthropology, Archaeology, Genetics
  • Science Visualized

    See these first-of-a-kind views of living human nerve cells

    The human brain is teeming with diversity. By plucking out delicate, live tissue during neurosurgery and then studying the resident cells, researchers have revealed a partial cast of neural characters that give rise to our thoughts, dreams and memories. 

    So far, researchers with the Allen Institute for Brain Science in Seattle have described the intricate shapes and electrical properties...

    11/09/2017 - 07:00 Neuroscience, Cells
  • News

    Scientists replaced 80 percent of a ‘butterfly’ boy’s skin

    In a last-ditch effort to save a dying 7-year-old boy, scientists have used stem cells and gene therapy to replace about 80 percent of his skin.

    This procedure’s success demonstrates that the combination therapy may be effective against some rare genetic skin disorders. The study also sheds light on how the skin replenishes itself, researchers report November 8 in Nature.

    In 2015,...

    11/08/2017 - 13:35 Genetics, Cells, Biomedicine
  • News

    Human study supports theory on why dengue can be worse the next time around

    Et tu, antibody? In humans, dengue can be more severe the second time around. Now, a study implicates an immune system treachery as the culprit.

    The study suggests that the amount of anti-dengue antibodies a person has matters. In a 12-year study of Nicaraguan children, low levels of dengue antibodies left over in the blood from a prior infection increased the risk of getting a life-...

    11/08/2017 - 07:00 Health, Immune Science
  • News

    Alzheimer’s protein can travel from blood to build up in the brain

    An Alzheimer’s-related protein can move from the blood to the brain and accumulate there, experiments on mice show for the first time.

    The results, published online October 31 in Molecular Psychiatry, suggest that the protein amyloid-beta outside the brain may contribute to the Alzheimer’s disease inside it, says Mathias Jucker, a neurobiologist at the University of Tübingen in Germany....

    11/06/2017 - 06:00 Neuroscience, Physiology