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E.g., 09/24/2017
E.g., 09/24/2017
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  • PET scans
  • HIV infecting a T cell
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Your search has returned 1699 articles:
  • News

    Gene variant linked to Alzheimer’s disease is a triple threat

    A genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease is a double, make that triple, whammy.

    In addition to speeding up the development of brain plaques associated with Alzheimer’s, a gene variant known as APOE4 also makes tau tangles — another signature of the disease — worse, researchers report online September 20 in Nature. APOE4 protein also ramps up brain inflammation that kills brain cells...

    09/22/2017 - 09:00 Neuroscience, Genetics, Cells
  • News

    By ganging up, HIV antibodies may defeat the virus

    For certain HIV antibodies, having a buddy or two makes a big difference in the fight against the virus.

    Combining the antibodies, called broadly neutralizing antibodies, may stop more strains of HIV than any single one can do alone, two new studies suggest. A “triple-threat” antibody molecule can bind to three different spots on the virus, researchers report online September 20 in...

    09/20/2017 - 14:30 Biomedicine, Immune Science
  • News

    In a first, human embryos edited to explore gene function

    For the first time, researchers have disabled a gene in human embryos to learn about its function.

    Using molecular scissors called CRISPR/Cas9, researchers made crippling cuts in the OCT4 gene, Kathy Niakan and colleagues report September 20 in Nature. The edits revealed a surprising role for the gene in the development of the placenta.

    Researchers commonly delete and disable genes...

    09/20/2017 - 13:24 Genetics, Development, Science & Society
  • The Science Life

    This biochemist brews a wild beer

    Craft brewers are going wild. Some of the trendiest beers on the market are intentionally brewed with yeast scavenged from nature, rather than the carefully cultivated ale or lager yeast used in most commercial beers.

    Matthew Bochman is in on the action. By day, he’s a biochemist at Indiana University Bloomington who studies how cells keep their DNA intact. On the side, he can be found...

    09/19/2017 - 10:00 Microbiology, Genetics, Science & Society
  • News in Brief

    Microbes hobble a widely used chemo drug

    Some bacteria may shield tumor cells against a common chemotherapy drug.

    Certain types of bacteria make an enzyme that inactivates the drug gemcitabine, researchers report in the Sept. 15 Science. Gemcitabine is used to treat patients with pancreatic, lung, breast and bladder cancers.

    Bacteria that produce the enzyme cytidine deaminase converted the drug to an inactive form. That...

    09/14/2017 - 14:00 Cancer, Microbiology
  • Scicurious

    Two artificial sweeteners together take the bitter out of bittersweet

    Artificial sweeteners can have a not-so-sweet side — a bitter aftertaste. The flavor can be such a turnoff that some people avoid the additives entirely. Decades ago, people noticed that for two artificial sweeteners — saccharin and cyclamate, which can taste bitter on their own — the bitterness disappears when they’re combined. But no one really knew why.

    It turns out that saccharin...

    09/14/2017 - 13:30 Genetics
  • News

    When a fungus invades the lungs, immune cells can tell it to self-destruct

    Immune cells can turn certain invaders on themselves, forcing them to prematurely self-destruct, researchers have discovered.

    In mice, when white blood cells in the lungs engulf spores of a common airborne fungus, these immune cells release an enzyme that sends the fungal cells into programmed cell death. That prevents the spores from setting up shop in the lungs and sparking a...

    09/07/2017 - 17:01 Immune Science, Health
  • News

    Woolly rhinos may have grown strange extra ribs before going extinct

    As time ran out for the woolly rhino, strange things happened. Before going extinct, some of the beasts faced an unusually high risk of growing bizarre ribs in their neck, a new study suggests. Those misplaced ribs might have signaled the animals’ impending demise.

    Scientists examined neck bones from 32 woolly rhinos and found indented spots on five of them where ribs had once attached...

    09/07/2017 - 11:00 Paleontology, Evolution, Physiology
  • News

    Zika could one day help combat deadly brain cancer

    Zika’s damaging neurological effects might someday be enlisted for good — to treat brain cancer.

    In human cells and in mice, the virus infected and killed the stem cells that become a glioblastoma, an aggressive brain tumor, but left healthy brain cells alone. Jeremy Rich, a regenerative medicine scientist at the University of California, San Diego, and colleagues report the findings...

    09/05/2017 - 16:54 Cancer, Biomedicine, Immune Science
  • Science Ticker

    FDA approves gene therapy to treat a rare cancer

    On August 30, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a novel gene therapy for patients with a rare type of leukemia. This is the first time the agency has greenlighted a gene therapy approach for use in the United States.

    The treatment, called CAR-T immunotherapy, uses genetically engineered T cells, immune system fighters usually tasked with identifying invaders in the body,...

    08/30/2017 - 17:17 Cancer, Genetics