April 13, 2019 | Science News

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April 13, 2019View Digital Issue

Editor's Note

Editor in Chief Nancy Shute discusses recent news about the asteroid Bennu and Kuiper Belt–object Ultima Thule.
By Nancy Shute | April 7, 2019
Magazine issue: Vol. 195, No. 7 , April 13, 2019 , p. 2

Features

Alaska landscape

Feature

Arctic browning could have far-reaching consequences for people and wildlife, affecting habitat and atmospheric carbon uptake as well as increasing wildfire risk.
RNA illustrations

Feature

RNAs do a lot more than act as middlemen for protein building. Here are a few of the ways they affect your health and disease.

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Science News is a nonprofit.

Help us keep you informed.

Editor's Note

Editor in Chief Nancy Shute discusses recent news about the asteroid Bennu and Kuiper Belt–object Ultima Thule.

Features

Alaska landscape
Arctic browning could have far-reaching consequences for people and wildlife, affecting habitat and atmospheric carbon uptake as well as increasing wildfire risk.
RNA illustrations
RNAs do a lot more than act as middlemen for protein building. Here are a few of the ways they affect your health and disease.

News

Earth magnetic field
An analysis of brain waves offers new evidence that people subconsciously process information about the planet’s magnetism.
a composite photo of two skulls showing differences in overbites
Eating soft, processed foods refashioned adults' jaws, which added “f” and “v” sounds to speech and changed languages worldwide, a study finds.
depression drug
Little is known about the long-term effects on people of a newly approved antidepressant based on the anesthetic ketamine.
Bennu
Bennu spews dust from its rocky surface, which may be a new kind of asteroid activity.
embryo fertilization
Prominent scientists are using the word “moratorium” to make it clear that experiments to create babies with altered genes are wrong, for now.
atomic clock
Physics obeys the same rules no matter what direction you’re facing, a new experiment confirms.
central Tibetan Plateau
New studies suggest that the Tibetan Plateau may have risen to its dizzying heights after 25 million years ago.
fossil egg
Scientists have found the first known fossil of a bird that died with an unlaid egg inside its body. The egg has been crushed by pressure over time.
slingshot spider
By winding up its web like a slingshot, the slingshot spider achieves an acceleration rate far faster than a cheetah’s.
Ultima Thule
The first geologic map of Ultima Thule shows it might be made of many smaller rocks that clumped together under the force of their own gravity.
amyloid-beta plaques
Precisely timed clicking noises can counter signs of Alzheimer’s in the brains of mice and improve memory.
Ryugu asteroid
Japan’s Hayabusa2 team has narrowed down the asteroid Ryugu’s origins based on its color.
male bee
Some male bees guard young that are likely not their own while mom looks for pollen, a study finds.
chimpanzees
Human activity is affecting chimps’ behavioral repertoire, a new study suggests. Creating chimp cultural heritage sites might save unique behaviors.
robotic gripper grabbing an apple
Fragile items, such as soft fruits, as well as heavier goods are in safe hands with a new robotic gripper.
charged solar particles and Earth's magnetosphere
Ice cores and tree rings reveal that Earth was blasted with a powerful solar storm 2,610 years ago.
electronic chip
In a first, electronic chip temperatures dip below a thousandth of a degree kelvin.

Notebook

virus replication
In 1969, a bacteria-infecting virus held promise for unlocking the secrets of viral replication. Fifty years later, the virus is a versatile tool for scientists.
data mining illustration
Artificial intelligence that helps make scientific discoveries needs to get better at admitting its uncertainty, Genevera Allen says.
starry dwarf frog
The newly identified starry dwarf frog represents a new species, genus and potentially even a new family.

Reviews & Previews

Tokyo
In the book ‘Cities,’ archaeologist Monica Smith sees the positives in past and present metropolises.
phage virus attacking bacteria
In ‘The Perfect Predator,’ an epidemiologist recounts the battle to save her husband from an antibiotic-resistant infection.

Letters to the Editor

Readers had questions about Neandertal spears, Earth’s inner core and more.

Science Visualized

fentanyl
New statistics on fentanyl-related overdoses show troubling increases in deaths among African-Americans, Hispanics and men.