February 2, 2019 | Science News

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February 2, 2019View Digital Issue

Editor's Note

Editor in Chief Nancy Shute discusses Science News' coverage of NASA's New Horizons spacecraft's flyby of Ultima Thule.
By Nancy Shute | January 27, 2019
Magazine issue: Vol. 195, No. 2 , February 2, 2019 , p. 2

Features

Kilauea lava flows

Feature

Kilauea’s 2018 eruption allowed volcanologists a clear window into the processes that have shaped and influenced the world’s most watched volcano.
illustration of Vitamin D with list of benefits

Feature

Once seen as a supplement with a long list of benefits, vitamin D’s glow may be dimming.

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Editor's Note

Editor in Chief Nancy Shute discusses Science News' coverage of NASA's New Horizons spacecraft's flyby of Ultima Thule.

Features

Kilauea lava flows
Kilauea’s 2018 eruption allowed volcanologists a clear window into the processes that have shaped and influenced the world’s most watched volcano.
illustration of Vitamin D with list of benefits
Once seen as a supplement with a long list of benefits, vitamin D’s glow may be dimming.

News

tobacco farmer
A new chemical road map for a process called photorespiration in plant cells could reduce energy waste to increase plant productivity.
TESS telescope
The TESS exoplanet hunter has spotted eight confirmed worlds in its first four months, and several of them are really weird.
a photo of a flightless midge
Fast-multiplying insects with earthworm powers have invaded Antarctica, and scientists are worried about how their waste could affect the continent.
optogenetic bladder implant
Experiments in rats show that a new soft device could help alleviate frequent, sudden urges to urinate.
Lassa virus
New technology for analyzing genetic data quickly in the field guided how Nigeria dealt with an outbreak of Lassa fever in 2018.
Chang’e-4 farside of moon
China’s Chang’e-4 lander and rover just became the first spacecraft to land on the farside of the moon.
blob of worms
Blobs of worms flow like a fluid, plop like a solid and fascinate scientists.
Australia Telescope Compact Array
A burst of light from far away may have been an odd type of exploding star or a white dwarf being eaten by a black hole.
nerve cells
In some forms of autism, nerve cells develop faster than normal, possibly setting the stage for the disorder, a study finds.
a photo of a woman hunched over in pain
Infertile women with endometriosis have a reduced amount of a protein found to be important for establishing pregnancy in mice, a study finds.
Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment
Astronomers have spotted a second repeating fast radio burst, and it looks a lot like the first.
2014 MU69
Ultima Thule’s snowmanlike shape shows the New Horizons target was probably two space rocks that got stuck together.
ultrasonic speaker
A new machine that levitates objects using sound waves can manipulate several particles at once.
honeybees on a honeycomb
A honeybee queen’s absence in the colony triggers some workers to turn queen-like and lay eggs, sometimes in other colonies.
jaw of medieval woman
Tooth tartar unveils an expert female manuscript painter buried at a German monastery.
Culex quinquefasciatus mosquito
A newly discovered protein found exclusively in mosquitoes may one day help control their numbers.
zirconium
Zirconium-88 captures neutrons with extreme efficiency, and scientists don’t yet know why.
cells dividing
Adult mice hearts have no stem cells, a study finds. The same may be true for people, and that’s not welcome news for those who’ve had a heart attack.

Notebook

earthquake damaged house
In the 1960s, researchers proposed preventing a big earthquake by creating smaller ones. That hasn’t quite worked out.
hand holding poop sample cup
Scientists have coined a new term — “in fimo” — to describe studies focused on feces.

Reviews & Previews

Talos and Medea
In the book ‘Gods and Robots,’ a scholar recounts how early civilizations explored artificial life through myths.
working out
In ‘Good to Go,’ science writer Christie Aschwanden puts science — and herself — to the test for the sake of sports recovery.

Letters to the Editor

Readers had questions about Parkinson’s disease, the new definition of a kilogram’s mass, Saturn’s moon Dione and more.

Science Visualized

pterosaur illustration
A new study provides evidence of plumelike structures in ancient flying reptiles.