February 3, 2018 | Science News

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February 3, 2018View Digital Issue

Editor's Note

Acting Editor in Chief Elizabeth Quill explores the history of memory and scientists' search for its physical trace in our brains.
By Elizabeth Quill | January 1, 2018
Magazine issue: Vol. 193, No. 2 , February 3, 2018 , p. 2

Features

brain illustration

Feature

New technology and new ideas spur the hunt for the physical basis of memory.
smartphone illustration

Feature

Smartphones’ powers of perception make them more user-friendly and efficient. But they also open new opportunities for privacy invasions.

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Help us keep you informed.

Editor's Note

Acting Editor in Chief Elizabeth Quill explores the history of memory and scientists' search for its physical trace in our brains.

Features

smartphone illustration
Smartphones’ powers of perception make them more user-friendly and efficient. But they also open new opportunities for privacy invasions.
brain illustration
New technology and new ideas spur the hunt for the physical basis of memory.

News

illustration of scissors cutting DNA
Immune reactions could shut down CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing.
worker honeybee
The case has never been fully closed for colony collapse disorder, and now bees face bigger problems.
dead stars illustration
A cosmic test fails to topple the strong equivalence principle.
Streptococcus pyogenes
Add-on genes in some bacteria shape the way strains interact with the immune system.
fast radio burst
A repeating fast radio burst has twisted waves, suggesting its home has an unusually strong magnetic field.
coral reef
Corals are now bleaching more frequently and severely than they were in the early 1980s.
illustration of magnetic monopoles
Using data from particle accelerators and dead stars, scientists eliminate some possible masses for magnetic monopoles.
illustration of inner structure of a white dwarf
The first map of the internal composition of a white dwarf star shows these stellar corpses contain more oxygen than expected, challenging stellar evolution theories.
synthetic cartilage
One of the key ingredients in this artificial cartilage is a nanoversion of the synthetic fiber in body armor.
Placental tissue
In mice, activating a key component of the body’s antiviral machinery in response to a Zika infection can cause harm to developing fetuses.
bonobo
Unlike people, these apes gravitate toward those who are unhelpful.
bacteria illustration
Ultrasound can help keep tabs on genetically modified bacteria to better fight disease inside the body.
Yellowstone
The subduction of an ancient tectonic plate may be the driving force behind Yellowstone’s volcanic eruptions.
illustration of SEXTANT
Timing signals from five pulsars allowed scientists to pinpoint an experiment’s place in space.
mouse brain capillary
Increased levels of one protein in old blood may contribute to its aging effects on the brain, a mouse study suggests.
Blowfly
Personal air conditioning the blowfly way: Dangle a droplet of saliva and then reswallow.

Notebook

reddit page
Tips on not being a conversation-killer, courtesy of an AI that studied over 60,000 Reddit threads.
Tests with a robot snailfish reveal why the deep-sea fish has mysterious goo in its body.
IUD
50 year ago, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration declared intrauterine devices safe and effective, though officials didn’t know how the IUDs worked.
jazz musicians
Jazz musicians’ creativity linked to brain dexterity.

Reviews & Previews

scuba diver
New documentary shows how an ancient teen and an infant have illuminated scientists’ understanding of the peopling of the Americas.

Letters to the Editor

Readers had questions about the universe's accelerating expansion, a hidden void in the Great Pyramid of Giza and what happens to human waste in space.

Science Visualized

Ptiloris paradiseus
Birds of paradise have superblack feathers because of tilted, spiky microscopic features in their feathers.