July 25, 2015 | Science News

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July 25, 2015

Editor's Note

Investigating both the orderly and disorderly dimensions of time provides the focus for a special issue of Science News.
By Eva Emerson | July 7, 2015
Magazine issue: Vol. 188 No. 2 , July 25, 2015 , p. 2

Features

time special

Feature

Science News writers report on the latest scientific investigations into time’s place in the physical, biological and mental worlds.
marine chronometer

Feature

For millennia, humans have harnessed the power of clocks to schedule prayers, guide ocean voyages and, lately, to chart the universe.
illustration of clocks and the brain

Feature

To perceive time, the brain relies on internal clocks that precisely orchestrate movement, sensing, memories and learning.
circadian clocks

Feature

Most of Earth’s creatures keep time with the planet’s day/night cycle. Scientists are still debating how and why the circadian clocks that govern biological timekeeping evolved.
time illustration

Feature

Gravity may explain how time always runs forward, even though the laws of physics should permit it to run backward.

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Editor's Note

Investigating both the orderly and disorderly dimensions of time provides the focus for a special issue of Science News.

Features

time illustration
Gravity may explain how time always runs forward, even though the laws of physics should permit it to run backward.
circadian clocks
Most of Earth’s creatures keep time with the planet’s day/night cycle. Scientists are still debating how and why the circadian clocks that govern biological timekeeping evolved.
illustration of clocks and the brain
To perceive time, the brain relies on internal clocks that precisely orchestrate movement, sensing, memories and learning.
marine chronometer
For millennia, humans have harnessed the power of clocks to schedule prayers, guide ocean voyages and, lately, to chart the universe.
time special
Science News writers report on the latest scientific investigations into time’s place in the physical, biological and mental worlds.

News

illustration of volcano on venus
The Venus Express orbiter detected possible signs of active volcanism on the planet next door.
A new study pinpoints the part of the brain that controls the neck muscles, tweaking the motor homunculus.
Brains crumple up just like wads of paper, a new study suggests.
eggs with patterns
Eggs of some species of warbler and weaver birds appear to have individual signatures, which can help distinguish them from the eggs of parasitic cuckoos.
religious fiesta in Peru
Common elements of music worldwide point to its central role in group cohesion.
immune cells
A drug that numbs nerve cells in mice’s airways offers a new way to ease the effects of an asthma attack.
dark galaxies
Nearly 1,000 shadowy galaxies lurk in a nearby cluster, some of which are as massive as the Milky Way and yet have only 0.1 percent the number of stars.
Australian bearded dragon
Genetic male bearded dragons changed to females by overheating in the wild can still breed successfully.
poachers stand over the body of an elephant
Genetic analysis of ivory DNA reveals major poaching hot spots in Africa.
Twenty-one of Earth’s 37 largest groundwater basins are rapidly depleting, satellite data show.
Kennewick Man’s skeleton
Genetic analysis of Kennewick Man suggests that the ancient Pacific Northwest man was most closely related to modern Native Americans, not Polynesians.
soup high in fat
Eating an extreme low-calorie diet that mimics fasting just a few consecutive days a month may yield a bounty of health benefits, research suggests.
A stockpile of the first generation of stars might be lighting up gas in a galaxy that existed roughly 800 million years after the Big Bang.
skin bacteria illustration
Vitamin B12 causes acne by altering metabolism of skin bacteria.
crack in Larsen C ice shelf
A fast-spreading crack threatens Larsen C, one of Antarctica’s biggest ice shelves, satellite data suggest.

Notebook

brightest galaxy
The brightest known galaxy is about 350 trillion times as bright as the sun, and a supermassive black hole is to blame.
 eyeless, compact yeti crab Kiwa tyleri
A newly discovered species of yeti crab thrives in tough conditions on Antarctic hydrothermal vents.
One of Beauveria bassiana's (a fungus) vicitims
The common fungus Beauveria bassiana makes white downy corpses of its victims.
Researchers unveiled a gun-shaped flame detector in 1965
Pingualuit Crater in northern Canada
Hundreds of undiscovered impact craters probably dot Earth’s surface, new research estimates.

Reviews & Previews

The Reason for Flowers
In ‘The Reason for Flowers’, a pollination ecologist chronicles the science and culture of blossoms from the dawn of humanity.
Scientific Babel
A new book explores the roles of war, politics and economics in the rise of English in scientific communication.

Letters to the Editor

Readers debate the pros and cons of reviving extinct species, discuss the odd light-processing machinery of the eye and more.

Science Visualized

mouse cells
By switching on a single gene, researchers turned cancer cells in mice back into normal intestinal tissue.