June 10, 2017 | Science News

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June 10, 2017View Digital Issue

Editor's Note

There’s heartbreak in this issue. Science News investigates different facets of the ongoing opioid epidemic in the United States.
By Elizabeth Quill | May 5, 2017
Magazine issue: Vol. 191 No. 11 , June 10, 2017 , p. 2

Features

opioid newborn

Feature

A surge in opioid-exposed newborns has U.S. doctors revamping treatments and focusing on families.
illustration of pills

Feature

Today’s opioids stop pain — but they’re also dangerous. Scientists are hunting for replacements.

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Editor's Note

There’s heartbreak in this issue. Science News investigates different facets of the ongoing opioid epidemic in the United States.

Features

illustration of pills
Today’s opioids stop pain — but they’re also dangerous. Scientists are hunting for replacements.
opioid newborn
A surge in opioid-exposed newborns has U.S. doctors revamping treatments and focusing on families.

News

pelvic exoskeleton
A new exoskeleton helps people prone to falling stay on their feet.
illustration of Beibeilong sinensis
A fossil embryo known as Baby Louie has been identified as a new species of dinosaur called Beibeilong sinensis.
black hole
Physicists demonstrate the possibility of a “naked” singularity in curved space.
HAT-P-26b illsutration
Compared with Neptune, HAT-P-26b’s atmosphere has few heavy elements, suggesting it formed differently than the ice giants in Earth’s solar system.
Mystacodon skull
A 36 million-year-old whale fossil bridges the gap between ancient toothy predators and modern filter-feeding baleen whales.
cluster of tumor cells
Source tumors may already contain the mutations that drive aggressive cancer spread.
antimicrobial
A new study lays out several rules to successfully enter gram-negative bacteria, which could lead to the development of sorely needed antibiotics.
mouse on an excercise wheel
An experimental "exercise in a pill" increases running endurance in mice before they step foot on a treadmill.
Catherine Pruszynski 
As an alternative to genetically modified mosquitoes, Florida skeeter police are testing one of two strategies that use bacteria to meddle with insect sex lives.
Alcatraz Island
Human noise stretches into the wilderness.
larvacean
A new deepwater laser tool measures the carbon-filtering power of snot nets created by little-known sea animals called giant larvaceans.
newborn baby wearing electrodes
EEG recordings can help indicate whether a newborn baby is in pain, a preliminary study suggests.
AMS experiment
Antimatter in cosmic rays could be a sign of dark matter.
Homo naledi skull
South African species Homo naledi is much younger than previously thought.
comet 67P
Molecular oxygen detected around comet 67P may not be a relic of the solar system’s birth. Instead, it may be generated by interactions of water, the solar wind and the comet’s surface.

Notebook

microglia
At first, ophthalmologist Xu Wang thought her experiment had failed. But instead, she revealed a new role for the breast cancer drug tamoxifen — protection from eye injury.
sea scorpion illustration
Ancient sea scorpion used a flexible, swordlike tail to hack at prey and defend against predators.
meteor shower
People can see and hear meteors simultaneously because of radio waves produced by the descending space rocks.
MRSA
Scientists have worried about antibiotic resistance for decades.
Small ice particles called ice-lollies, because of their lollipop-like appearance, can form in clouds.

Reviews & Previews

WISE satellite
Backyard Worlds: Planet 9, a citizen science project, lets space enthusiasts search for undiscovered objects in the sky, including a hypothesized planet at the far reaches of the solar system.

Letters to the Editor

Readers sent feedback on under-ice greenhouses in the Arctic, the Martian atmosphere and more.

Science Visualized

simulation of magnetic fields on HAT-P 7b
Simulations of HAT-P 7b’s magnetic field give clues to why the exoplanet’s winds blow both east and west.