June 23, 2018 | Science News

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June 23, 2018View Digital Issue

Editor's Note

Editor in Chief Nancy Shute discusses physicist Emmy Noether and women being underrepresented in science fields.
By Nancy Shute | June 6, 2018
Magazine issue: Vol. 193, No. 11 , June 23, 2018 , p. 2

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Editor's Note

Editor in Chief Nancy Shute discusses physicist Emmy Noether and women being underrepresented in science fields.

Features

illustration of Emmy Noether
A century after she published a groundbreaking mathematical theory, Emmy Noether gets her due.
Michael Douglas
DNA testing has become a new way for millions of Americans to expand their family trees and learn something about themselves, but results vary widely.

News

rice paddy
Field experiments add vitamins to list of nutrients at risk from a changing atmosphere.
A space rock’s backward orbit could be a hint of unusual origins.
MiniBooNE
Neutrinos show up in greater numbers than expected in an experiment, possibly bolstering the idea of a fourth type of the particle.
Pluto dunes
Images from the New Horizons spacecraft reveal dunes on Pluto — but the sand-sized grains must have had an unusual boost to get moving.
lizard-snake fossil
CT scan reveals hidden identity of an unusual lizard fossil found years ago in the Italian Alps.
taxis
Hive-minded self-driving cars could curb traffic congestion and vehicle pollution.
plasma blob in sun's atmosphere
Scientists found rain in the sun’s corona where they didn’t expect it, which could help solve the mystery of why the corona is so hot.
Tanya Van Cuylenborg and Jay Cook
The arrest of a second murder suspect with the help of genetic genealogy raises worries that suspicionless searches may be next.
illustration of bird
A tree-loving lifestyle became a risk for ancient birds in a world-changing catastrophe.
person holding gun
A new survey suggests that gun owners support many potential gun-control policies — now research on their efficacy needs to catch up.
colonoscopy
The American Cancer Society recommends that colorectal screening begin at the age of 45 for average-risk individuals.
Geologist Alia Lesnek
Alaskan glaciers retreated in time for ancient coastal entries of the first Americans.
taking blood pressure
Big reductions in heart attacks, strokes and deaths may be possible under 2017 blood pressure guidelines.
XENON1T experiment
The XENON1T experiment saw no signs of hypothetical dark matter particles called WIMPs.
bonobos
As in humans, female bonobos become helpers for mothers giving birth, data from captive apes suggest.
wasp and leafworm
The crop plants defend themselves with zombie-maker wasps, but one pest has a desperate work-around.

Notebook

at home tests for telomere length
Telomere testing for consumers offers a poor measure of “biological age,” says Johns Hopkins oncologist Mary Armanios.
pool
In a 15-year period, hotel swimming pools and water parks had the highest number of swimming-related disease outbreaks in the United States.
Joseph Weber
Despite an unverified discovery in 1968, spacetime ripples remained elusive for nearly 50 years.
leaf-cutter ants
Leaf-cutter ants struggle to carry wet leaves, so they run to avoid rain.

Reviews & Previews

Tina Hesman Saey
Ancestry results vary widely depending on which company you use.

Letters to the Editor

Readers had questions about Bronze Age pendulum saws, dark matter, lazer tweezers and more.

Science Visualized

Saturn moons and simulated moons
Nearly head-on collisions between icy moonlets might be responsible for the peculiar shapes of some of Saturn’s moons, computer simulations suggest.