June 27, 2015 | Science News

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June 27, 2015

Editor's Note

Precision matters, whether looking at global temperatures, subatomic particles or the carefully timed approach to a faraway world.
By Eva Emerson | June 6, 2015
Magazine issue: Vol. 187, No. 13 , June 27, 2015 , p. 2

Features

Pictures of criminals

Feature

Psychopaths often don’t fit movie stereotypes, but they share particular characteristics. New research shows that, contrary to popular thought, cognitive behavioral therapy can help some psychopaths stay out of prison.
illustration of New Horizons journey to Pluto

Feature

Earth will get its first good look at Pluto and its five known moons when New Horizons sails past on July 14.

Call to Action

SUPPORT SCIENCE NEWS

Science News is a nonprofit.

Help us keep you informed.

Editor's Note

Precision matters, whether looking at global temperatures, subatomic particles or the carefully timed approach to a faraway world.

Features

illustration of New Horizons journey to Pluto
Earth will get its first good look at Pluto and its five known moons when New Horizons sails past on July 14.
Pictures of criminals
Psychopaths often don’t fit movie stereotypes, but they share particular characteristics. New research shows that, contrary to popular thought, cognitive behavioral therapy can help some psychopaths stay out of prison.

News

Glaciers around Mt. Everest will lost most of their ice by the end of the century, new research predicts.
drugs in fingerprints
Scientists can now detect and measure the amount of illegal drugs, such as cocaine and heroin, on a lone fingerprint.
climate data
Skewed data may have caused the appearance of the recent global warming hiatus, new research suggests.
CMS collision illustration
Physicists hope a revamped Large Hadron Collider will discover new particles and forces that could help explain dark matter and other mysteries of the universe.
Typhoon Haiyan
Warming subsurface water in the Pacific will boost average typhoon intensity 14 percent by 2100, new research predicts.
illustration of Ebola entering the cell
Ebola’s ability to infect appears to depend on a key transport protein that guides the virus into cells.
pictionary drawings
Brain scan experiment hints that cerebellum might have a hand in getting creative juices flowing.
Cranium 17
A 430,000-year-old hominid skull shows signs of murder, making it the earliest suspected homicide.
dino egg
Dinosaur eggs came in bold shades of blue-green and brown-speckled blue.
dead dolphin
Lung lesions and other injuries link an extensive die-off of dolphins in the Gulf of Mexico to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill.
eyelid
Healthy tissue carries mutations that drive cancer, samples of normal skin cells show.
California two-spot octopus
Eyes aren’t the only cephalopod body parts with light-catching molecules.
Supernova
Multiple supernovas show off some of the ways a star can explode.
Long trips in space may thin the skin.
upper jaw with teeth
Fossil jaws dating to over 3 million years ago may add a new species to the ancient hominid mix.
pain path
Scientists have identified a new genetic culprit for the inability to perceive pain.

Notebook

ancient species of wading bird
Fossil find suggests modern birds’ oldest avian relative lived about 6 million years before previous record holder.
new volcanic islands
Satellite maps reveal the formation of two new volcanic islands in the Red Sea.
Odontomachus brunneus ant
Powerful jaws make the Odontomachus brunneus ant a skilled escape artist.
kids with tablets
Fifty years ago, scientists were looking forward to technology in the classroom.
gene stats
Human genes can substitute for 47 percent of essential genes in baker’s yeast, new research shows.

Reviews & Previews

Max Planck
A biography by physicist Brandon Brown illuminates the personal struggles of the physics pioneer.
A pig in a field
From ancient forests to modern farms, pigs’ relationship with humans has been symbiotic.

Letters to the Editor

Readers discuss how Earth got its water, chat about a hot spot's violent past and more.

Science Visualized

actin filaments
The counterclockwise twist of protein fibers jutting out from the edge of human cells allow the cells to distinguish right from left.